The usefulness of phlebotomy in the palliative care setting.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135958
Title:
The usefulness of phlebotomy in the palliative care setting.
Authors:
McCormack, Ruaidhrí; Sui, Jessica; Conroy, Marian; Stodart, James
Affiliation:
Department of Palliative Medicine, Mid-Western Regional Hospital , Limerick, Ireland. r.mccormack@kcl.ac.uk
Citation:
The usefulness of phlebotomy in the palliative care setting. 2011, 14 (3):297-9 J Palliat Med
Journal:
Journal of palliative medicine
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135958
DOI:
10.1089/jpm.2010.0435
PubMed ID:
21265635
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21265635
Abstract:
To establish the reasons for phlebotomy and evaluate the usefulness of blood testing in the palliative setting.; The design was that of a questionnaire-based prospective study conducted in the 30-bed Specialist Palliative Care Unit at Milford Care Centre between March 23 and May 23, 2010. A questionnaire was completed by the performing clinician following each venipuncture, which included details of the admitted patient, the blood tests performed, the reason(s) for testing, and the usefulness of blood testing in diagnosing and influencing management.; Fifty blood tests were conducted on 37 inpatients. The mean age of patients was 66.7 years and 54.1% were male. The top three diagnoses were malignancy of bowel, ovary, and prostate, respectively. The top three reasons for venipuncture were to manage medications, establish the need for blood transfusion, and guide management of sepsis. Thirty percent of phlebotomy sessions changed management, 40.7% ruled in an important diagnosis, and 86% ruled out an important diagnosis. Forty-eight percent of phlebotomy sessions had at least one type of test "added on" that in hindsight was unnecessary.; Blood testing is a useful tool in the palliative setting to guide management and to ascertain diagnoses relevant to symptom control. For reasons of laboratory time and economic cost, unnecessary additional tests should be kept to a minimum.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Aged; Female; Humans; Ireland; Male; Palliative Care; Phlebotomy; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Unnecessary Procedures
ISSN:
1557-7740

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcCormack, Ruaidhríen
dc.contributor.authorSui, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorConroy, Marianen
dc.contributor.authorStodart, Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-13T11:39:04Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-13T11:39:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.identifier.citationThe usefulness of phlebotomy in the palliative care setting. 2011, 14 (3):297-9 J Palliat Meden
dc.identifier.issn1557-7740-
dc.identifier.pmid21265635-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/jpm.2010.0435-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/135958-
dc.description.abstractTo establish the reasons for phlebotomy and evaluate the usefulness of blood testing in the palliative setting.-
dc.description.abstractThe design was that of a questionnaire-based prospective study conducted in the 30-bed Specialist Palliative Care Unit at Milford Care Centre between March 23 and May 23, 2010. A questionnaire was completed by the performing clinician following each venipuncture, which included details of the admitted patient, the blood tests performed, the reason(s) for testing, and the usefulness of blood testing in diagnosing and influencing management.-
dc.description.abstractFifty blood tests were conducted on 37 inpatients. The mean age of patients was 66.7 years and 54.1% were male. The top three diagnoses were malignancy of bowel, ovary, and prostate, respectively. The top three reasons for venipuncture were to manage medications, establish the need for blood transfusion, and guide management of sepsis. Thirty percent of phlebotomy sessions changed management, 40.7% ruled in an important diagnosis, and 86% ruled out an important diagnosis. Forty-eight percent of phlebotomy sessions had at least one type of test "added on" that in hindsight was unnecessary.-
dc.description.abstractBlood testing is a useful tool in the palliative setting to guide management and to ascertain diagnoses relevant to symptom control. For reasons of laboratory time and economic cost, unnecessary additional tests should be kept to a minimum.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21265635en
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPalliative Care-
dc.subject.meshPhlebotomy-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshUnnecessary Procedures-
dc.titleThe usefulness of phlebotomy in the palliative care setting.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Palliative Medicine, Mid-Western Regional Hospital , Limerick, Ireland. r.mccormack@kcl.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalJournal of palliative medicineen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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