Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135762
Title:
Peanut allergy.
Authors:
Hourihane, Jonathan O'B
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Clinical Investigations Unit, Cork University Hospital, University College Cork, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. J.Hourihane@ucc.ie
Citation:
Peanut allergy. 2011, 58 (2):445-58, xi Pediatr. Clin. North Am.
Journal:
Pediatric clinics of North America
Issue Date:
Apr-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135762
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2011.02.004
PubMed ID:
21453812
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21453812
Abstract:
Peanut allergy may affect up to 2% of children in some countries, making it one of the most common conditions of childhood. Peanut allergy is a marker of a broad and possibly severe atopic phenotype. Nearly all children with peanut allergy have other allergic conditions. Peanut accounts for a disproportionate number of fatal and near fatal food-related allergies. Families with a child or children with peanut allergy can struggle to adapt to the stringent avoidance measures required. Although oral induction of tolerance represents the cutting edge of peanut allergy management, it is not yet ready for routine practice.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Agriculture; Child; Cooking; Cross Reactions; Desensitization, Immunologic; Diagnosis, Differential; Humans; Immune Tolerance; Immunoglobulin E; Peanut Hypersensitivity; Prevalence; Risk Factors; World Health
ISSN:
1557-8240

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHourihane, Jonathan O'Ben
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-11T13:26:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-11T13:26:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-04-
dc.identifier.citationPeanut allergy. 2011, 58 (2):445-58, xi Pediatr. Clin. North Am.en
dc.identifier.issn1557-8240-
dc.identifier.pmid21453812-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pcl.2011.02.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/135762-
dc.description.abstractPeanut allergy may affect up to 2% of children in some countries, making it one of the most common conditions of childhood. Peanut allergy is a marker of a broad and possibly severe atopic phenotype. Nearly all children with peanut allergy have other allergic conditions. Peanut accounts for a disproportionate number of fatal and near fatal food-related allergies. Families with a child or children with peanut allergy can struggle to adapt to the stringent avoidance measures required. Although oral induction of tolerance represents the cutting edge of peanut allergy management, it is not yet ready for routine practice.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21453812en
dc.subject.meshAgriculture-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshCooking-
dc.subject.meshCross Reactions-
dc.subject.meshDesensitization, Immunologic-
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differential-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmune Tolerance-
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin E-
dc.subject.meshPeanut Hypersensitivity-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshWorld Health-
dc.titlePeanut allergy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Paediatrics and Child Health, Clinical Investigations Unit, Cork University Hospital, University College Cork, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. J.Hourihane@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalPediatric clinics of North Americaen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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