The enteric microbiota in the pathogenesis and management of constipation.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135655
Title:
The enteric microbiota in the pathogenesis and management of constipation.
Authors:
Quigley, E M M
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Clinical Sciences Building, Cork University Hospital, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Ireland. e.quigley@ucc.ie
Citation:
The enteric microbiota in the pathogenesis and management of constipation. 2011, 25 (1):119-26 Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol
Journal:
Best practice & research. Clinical gastroenterology
Issue Date:
Feb-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135655
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpg.2011.01.003
PubMed ID:
21382583
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21382583
Abstract:
For centuries, fiber has been recommended on an empirical basis for the management of constipation; it has only been in recent decades that the mechanisms whereby fiber and related products may influence colonic function have begun to be elucidated. The interaction between fiber and the microbiota of the human colon appears to play a major role in generating the beneficial effects of fiber. The microbiota is also the target for the other therapeutic interventions discussed in this chapter: prebiotics and probiotics. While a scientific basis for a role for these approaches in the management of constipation continues to develop, evidence from high-quality clinical trials to support their use in daily practice continues to lag far behind. While benefits for fiber and, perhaps, for certain prebiotic and probiotic preparations in constipation appear to be extant there is a real need for large well-conducted clinical trials in this important area of human medicine.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Constipation; Dietary Fiber; Humans; Intestines; Prebiotics; Probiotics; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
1532-1916

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, E M Men
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-08T11:53:39Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-08T11:53:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-02-
dc.identifier.citationThe enteric microbiota in the pathogenesis and management of constipation. 2011, 25 (1):119-26 Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterolen
dc.identifier.issn1532-1916-
dc.identifier.pmid21382583-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpg.2011.01.003-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/135655-
dc.description.abstractFor centuries, fiber has been recommended on an empirical basis for the management of constipation; it has only been in recent decades that the mechanisms whereby fiber and related products may influence colonic function have begun to be elucidated. The interaction between fiber and the microbiota of the human colon appears to play a major role in generating the beneficial effects of fiber. The microbiota is also the target for the other therapeutic interventions discussed in this chapter: prebiotics and probiotics. While a scientific basis for a role for these approaches in the management of constipation continues to develop, evidence from high-quality clinical trials to support their use in daily practice continues to lag far behind. While benefits for fiber and, perhaps, for certain prebiotic and probiotic preparations in constipation appear to be extant there is a real need for large well-conducted clinical trials in this important area of human medicine.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21382583en
dc.subject.meshConstipation-
dc.subject.meshDietary Fiber-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIntestines-
dc.subject.meshPrebiotics-
dc.subject.meshProbiotics-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleThe enteric microbiota in the pathogenesis and management of constipation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Clinical Sciences Building, Cork University Hospital, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Ireland. e.quigley@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalBest practice & research. Clinical gastroenterologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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