Nanodrug applications in photodynamic therapy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135637
Title:
Nanodrug applications in photodynamic therapy.
Authors:
Paszko, Edyta; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Senge, Mathias O; Kelleher, Dermot P; Reynolds, John V
Affiliation:
Medicinal Chemistry, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Nanodrug applications in photodynamic therapy. 2011, 8 (1):14-29 Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther
Journal:
Photodiagnosis and photodynamic therapy
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135637
DOI:
10.1016/j.pdpdt.2010.12.001
PubMed ID:
21333931
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21333931
Abstract:
Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has developed over last century and is now becoming a more widely used medical tool having gained regulatory approval for the treatment of various diseases such as cancer and macular degeneration. It is a two-step technique in which the delivery of a photosensitizing drug is followed by the irradiation of light. Activated photosensitizers transfer energy to molecular oxygen which results in the generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn cause cells apoptosis or necrosis. Although this modality has significantly improved the quality of life and survival time for many cancer patients it still offers significant potential for further improvement. In addition to the development of new PDT drugs, the use of nanosized carriers for photosensitizers is a promising approach which might improve the efficiency of photodynamic activity and which can overcome many side effects associated with classic photodynamic therapy. This review aims at highlighting the different types of nanomedical approaches currently used in PDT and outlines future trends and limitations of nanodelivery of photosensitizers.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Animals; Drug Compounding; Humans; Nanocapsules; Nanomedicine; Photochemotherapy
ISSN:
1873-1597

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPaszko, Edytaen
dc.contributor.authorEhrhardt, Carstenen
dc.contributor.authorSenge, Mathias Oen
dc.contributor.authorKelleher, Dermot Pen
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, John Ven
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-08T12:06:59Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-08T12:06:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.identifier.citationNanodrug applications in photodynamic therapy. 2011, 8 (1):14-29 Photodiagnosis Photodyn Theren
dc.identifier.issn1873-1597-
dc.identifier.pmid21333931-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pdpdt.2010.12.001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/135637-
dc.description.abstractPhotodynamic therapy (PDT) has developed over last century and is now becoming a more widely used medical tool having gained regulatory approval for the treatment of various diseases such as cancer and macular degeneration. It is a two-step technique in which the delivery of a photosensitizing drug is followed by the irradiation of light. Activated photosensitizers transfer energy to molecular oxygen which results in the generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn cause cells apoptosis or necrosis. Although this modality has significantly improved the quality of life and survival time for many cancer patients it still offers significant potential for further improvement. In addition to the development of new PDT drugs, the use of nanosized carriers for photosensitizers is a promising approach which might improve the efficiency of photodynamic activity and which can overcome many side effects associated with classic photodynamic therapy. This review aims at highlighting the different types of nanomedical approaches currently used in PDT and outlines future trends and limitations of nanodelivery of photosensitizers.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21333931en
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshDrug Compounding-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNanocapsules-
dc.subject.meshNanomedicine-
dc.subject.meshPhotochemotherapy-
dc.titleNanodrug applications in photodynamic therapy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMedicinal Chemistry, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalPhotodiagnosis and photodynamic therapyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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