The added value of a human rights-based approach to mental health in Irish prisons.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135351
Title:
The added value of a human rights-based approach to mental health in Irish prisons.
Authors:
Byrne, Michael ( 0000-0002-1675-9850 ) ; Irwin, Judy
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE), Roscommon Integrated Services
Citation:
(2010) 16(1) MLJI 34
Publisher:
Thompson Round Hall
Journal:
Medico-Legal Journal of Ireland
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135351
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article examines the body of evidence that suggests that the State has failed to ensure mental health services for Irish prisoners. While seeking to consider the positive developments in mental health provision in prisons, namely the establishment of the Prison In-reach and Court Liaison Service (PICLS), this article also seeks to show that prisons are not meeting acceptable standards as laid down by national and international human rights law. Findings suggest that prisoners are being released back into society not having received the appropriate treatment, and may as a result, be a risk to themselves and others. There has been much criticism of Irish prisons at both a national and international level, with the Human Rights Commission (HRC) drawing particular attention to a lack of mental health services. Drawing on specific case law from other European countries, the scope of the application of the European Convention on Human Rights in challenging the treatment of persons with mental health difficulties in Irish prisons is also outlined. With access to psychological therapies falling far short of acceptable standards as recommended by human rights law and other monitoring bodies, there is a real risk that mental health problems will continue to develop in this already vulnerable community. In conclusion, the article reminds the reader that our health service has a responsibility in providing care and treatment to people with mental health difficulties in accordance with their statutory duties. Adequate treatment must also be provided within the community, with risk assessment being carried out as set down by international standards. The recovery model is put forward as best practice in the development of a therapeutic environment, which addresses the biological, psychological and social factors that contribute to mental health difficulties in a more holistic way.
Keywords:
MENTAL HEALTH; PRISON; HUMAN RIGHTS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Judyen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-05T14:00:52Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-05T14:00:52Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citation(2010) 16(1) MLJI 34en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/135351-
dc.descriptionThis article examines the body of evidence that suggests that the State has failed to ensure mental health services for Irish prisoners. While seeking to consider the positive developments in mental health provision in prisons, namely the establishment of the Prison In-reach and Court Liaison Service (PICLS), this article also seeks to show that prisons are not meeting acceptable standards as laid down by national and international human rights law. Findings suggest that prisoners are being released back into society not having received the appropriate treatment, and may as a result, be a risk to themselves and others. There has been much criticism of Irish prisons at both a national and international level, with the Human Rights Commission (HRC) drawing particular attention to a lack of mental health services. Drawing on specific case law from other European countries, the scope of the application of the European Convention on Human Rights in challenging the treatment of persons with mental health difficulties in Irish prisons is also outlined. With access to psychological therapies falling far short of acceptable standards as recommended by human rights law and other monitoring bodies, there is a real risk that mental health problems will continue to develop in this already vulnerable community. In conclusion, the article reminds the reader that our health service has a responsibility in providing care and treatment to people with mental health difficulties in accordance with their statutory duties. Adequate treatment must also be provided within the community, with risk assessment being carried out as set down by international standards. The recovery model is put forward as best practice in the development of a therapeutic environment, which addresses the biological, psychological and social factors that contribute to mental health difficulties in a more holistic way.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThompson Round Hallen
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectPRISONen
dc.subjectHUMAN RIGHTSen
dc.titleThe added value of a human rights-based approach to mental health in Irish prisons.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE), Roscommon Integrated Servicesen
dc.identifier.journalMedico-Legal Journal of Irelanden
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