Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135011
Title:
Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.
Authors:
Vickers, I; Fitzgerald, M; Murchan, S; Cotter, S; O'Flanagan, D; Cafferkey, M; Humphreys, H
Affiliation:
Epidemiology and Molecular Biology Unit and Irish Meningococcal and Meningitis Reference Laboratory, Children's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. imelda.vickers@cuh.ie
Citation:
Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland. 2011, 139 (5):783-90 Epidemiol. Infect.
Journal:
Epidemiology and infection
Issue Date:
May-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/135011
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268810001743
PubMed ID:
20642870
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20642870
Abstract:
The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Typing Techniques; Cefotaxime; Child; Child, Preschool; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Ireland; Male; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Middle Aged; Penicillins; Pneumococcal Infections; Pneumococcal Vaccines; Serotyping; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Vaccination; Young Adult; beta-Lactam Resistance
ISSN:
1469-4409

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVickers, Ien
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Men
dc.contributor.authorMurchan, Sen
dc.contributor.authorCotter, Sen
dc.contributor.authorO'Flanagan, Den
dc.contributor.authorCafferkey, Men
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, Hen
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-30T15:11:40Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-30T15:11:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-05-
dc.identifier.citationSerotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland. 2011, 139 (5):783-90 Epidemiol. Infect.en
dc.identifier.issn1469-4409-
dc.identifier.pmid20642870-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268810001743-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/135011-
dc.description.abstractThe 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20642870en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents-
dc.subject.meshBacterial Typing Techniques-
dc.subject.meshCefotaxime-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Sensitivity Tests-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPenicillins-
dc.subject.meshPneumococcal Infections-
dc.subject.meshPneumococcal Vaccines-
dc.subject.meshSerotyping-
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus pneumoniae-
dc.subject.meshVaccination-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.subject.meshbeta-Lactam Resistance-
dc.titleSerotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEpidemiology and Molecular Biology Unit and Irish Meningococcal and Meningitis Reference Laboratory, Children's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. imelda.vickers@cuh.ieen
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and infectionen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.