Orientation to time as a guide to the presence and severity of cognitive impairment in older hospital patients.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/134990
Title:
Orientation to time as a guide to the presence and severity of cognitive impairment in older hospital patients.
Authors:
O'Keeffe, Emma; Mukhtar, Osman; O'Keeffe, Shaun T
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Unit 4, Merlin Park University Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sokanc@iolfree.ie
Citation:
Orientation to time as a guide to the presence and severity of cognitive impairment in older hospital patients. 2011, 82 (5):500-4 J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.
Journal:
Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
Issue Date:
May-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/134990
DOI:
10.1136/jnnp.2010.214817
PubMed ID:
20852313
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20852313
Abstract:
Testing of orientation to time is an important part of mental status examination. The validity of errors in different aspects of temporal orientation was examined in older hospital patients as a guide to the presence of dementia or delirium and as a measure of the severity of dementia, as defined by the Global Deterioration Scale.; Inpatients and outpatients attending an acute hospital underwent independent assessments by two doctors on the same day to determine orientation to time and cognitive status. Optimum cut-offs for error scores on the different aspects of temporal orientation were calculated to maximise the sum of sensitivity and specificity for detection of dementia or delirium.; Of the 262 patients assessed, 62 (23.7%) had dementia or delirium. The best cut-offs for detection of these disorders were: any error in identifying the year, month, day of the month or day of the week; and an error of more than 1 h in identifying the time of day. Failure to identify the year correctly was the most valuable single sign of dementia or delirium (sensitivity 86% and specificity 94%); failure to identify either year or month correctly was 95% sensitive and 86.5% specific for the detection of cognitive impairment. Severity of temporal disorientation, measured using a number of approaches, was strongly associated with severity of dementia.; Disorientation to time is a useful guide to the presence and severity of dementia or delirium in older hospital patients. Failure to identify the year or month correctly is a sufficiently sensitive and specific indicator of dementia or delirium to warrant more detailed cognitive assessment in this population.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Confusion; Delirium; Dementia; Female; Humans; Inpatients; Length of Stay; Male; Neuropsychological Tests; Orientation; Sensitivity and Specificity; Severity of Illness Index
ISSN:
1468-330X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Keeffe, Emmaen
dc.contributor.authorMukhtar, Osmanen
dc.contributor.authorO'Keeffe, Shaun Ten
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-30T14:57:42Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-30T14:57:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-05-
dc.identifier.citationOrientation to time as a guide to the presence and severity of cognitive impairment in older hospital patients. 2011, 82 (5):500-4 J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.en
dc.identifier.issn1468-330X-
dc.identifier.pmid20852313-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jnnp.2010.214817-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/134990-
dc.description.abstractTesting of orientation to time is an important part of mental status examination. The validity of errors in different aspects of temporal orientation was examined in older hospital patients as a guide to the presence of dementia or delirium and as a measure of the severity of dementia, as defined by the Global Deterioration Scale.-
dc.description.abstractInpatients and outpatients attending an acute hospital underwent independent assessments by two doctors on the same day to determine orientation to time and cognitive status. Optimum cut-offs for error scores on the different aspects of temporal orientation were calculated to maximise the sum of sensitivity and specificity for detection of dementia or delirium.-
dc.description.abstractOf the 262 patients assessed, 62 (23.7%) had dementia or delirium. The best cut-offs for detection of these disorders were: any error in identifying the year, month, day of the month or day of the week; and an error of more than 1 h in identifying the time of day. Failure to identify the year correctly was the most valuable single sign of dementia or delirium (sensitivity 86% and specificity 94%); failure to identify either year or month correctly was 95% sensitive and 86.5% specific for the detection of cognitive impairment. Severity of temporal disorientation, measured using a number of approaches, was strongly associated with severity of dementia.-
dc.description.abstractDisorientation to time is a useful guide to the presence and severity of dementia or delirium in older hospital patients. Failure to identify the year or month correctly is a sufficiently sensitive and specific indicator of dementia or delirium to warrant more detailed cognitive assessment in this population.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20852313en
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshConfusion-
dc.subject.meshDelirium-
dc.subject.meshDementia-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInpatients-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Tests-
dc.subject.meshOrientation-
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificity-
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Index-
dc.titleOrientation to time as a guide to the presence and severity of cognitive impairment in older hospital patients.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geriatric Medicine, Unit 4, Merlin Park University Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sokanc@iolfree.ieen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatryen
dc.description.provinceConnacht-

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