Who benefits from supported employment: a meta-analytic study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/132569
Title:
Who benefits from supported employment: a meta-analytic study.
Authors:
Campbell, Kikuko; Bond, Gary R; Drake, Robert E
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. kiyamamo@iupui.edu
Citation:
Who benefits from supported employment: a meta-analytic study. 2011, 37 (2):370-80 Schizophr Bull
Journal:
Schizophrenia bulletin
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/132569
DOI:
10.1093/schbul/sbp066
PubMed ID:
19661196
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661196
Abstract:
This meta-analysis sought to identify which subgroups of clients with severe mental illness (SMI) benefited from evidence-based supported employment.; We used meta-analysis to pool the samples from 4 randomized controlled trials comparing the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment to well-regarded vocational approaches using stepwise models and brokered services. Meta-analysis was used to determine the magnitude of effects for IPS/control group differences within specific client subgroups (defined by 2 work history, 7 sociodemographic, and 8 clinical variables) on 3 competitive employment outcomes (obtaining a job, total weeks worked, and job tenure).; The findings strongly favored IPS, with large effect sizes across all outcomes: 0.96 for job acquisition, 0.79 for total weeks worked, and 0.74 for job tenure. Overall, 90 (77%) of the 117 effect sizes calculated for the 39 subgroups exceeded 0.70, and all 117 favored IPS.; IPS produces better competitive employment outcomes for persons with SMI than alternative vocational programs regardless of background demographic, clinical, and employment characteristics.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1745-1701

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Kikukoen
dc.contributor.authorBond, Gary Ren
dc.contributor.authorDrake, Robert Een
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-03T15:19:46Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-03T15:19:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.identifier.citationWho benefits from supported employment: a meta-analytic study. 2011, 37 (2):370-80 Schizophr Bullen
dc.identifier.issn1745-1701-
dc.identifier.pmid19661196-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/schbul/sbp066-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/132569-
dc.description.abstractThis meta-analysis sought to identify which subgroups of clients with severe mental illness (SMI) benefited from evidence-based supported employment.-
dc.description.abstractWe used meta-analysis to pool the samples from 4 randomized controlled trials comparing the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment to well-regarded vocational approaches using stepwise models and brokered services. Meta-analysis was used to determine the magnitude of effects for IPS/control group differences within specific client subgroups (defined by 2 work history, 7 sociodemographic, and 8 clinical variables) on 3 competitive employment outcomes (obtaining a job, total weeks worked, and job tenure).-
dc.description.abstractThe findings strongly favored IPS, with large effect sizes across all outcomes: 0.96 for job acquisition, 0.79 for total weeks worked, and 0.74 for job tenure. Overall, 90 (77%) of the 117 effect sizes calculated for the 39 subgroups exceeded 0.70, and all 117 favored IPS.-
dc.description.abstractIPS produces better competitive employment outcomes for persons with SMI than alternative vocational programs regardless of background demographic, clinical, and employment characteristics.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661196en
dc.titleWho benefits from supported employment: a meta-analytic study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. kiyamamo@iupui.eduen
dc.identifier.journalSchizophrenia bulletinen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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