Routine calcium measurement is not necessary after most thyroid surgeries: a prospective clinical study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/131878
Title:
Routine calcium measurement is not necessary after most thyroid surgeries: a prospective clinical study.
Authors:
Quinn, E M; Neary, P M; O'Connor, O J; Shafiq, A; Kelly, J; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Academic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. edelquinn@rcsi.ie
Citation:
Routine calcium measurement is not necessary after most thyroid surgeries: a prospective clinical study. 2010, 35 (6):468-73 Clin Otolaryngol
Journal:
Clinical otolaryngology : official journal of ENT-UK ; official journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery
Issue Date:
Dec-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/131878
DOI:
10.1111/j.1749-4486.2010.02222.x
PubMed ID:
21199407
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21199407
Abstract:
Calcium levels are often measured to diagnose postoperative hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy. The aims of this study were to (i) prospectively determine the incidence of symptomatic and biochemical hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy, (ii) to identify if any associations exist between hypocalcaemia, type of surgery, histological diagnosis, specimen size/weight and the presence of histological parathyroid tissue and (iii) to evaluate the necessity of routine measurement of calcium levels following all thyroidectomies.; Prospective clinical study.; University teaching hospital.; Eighty-six patients presenting consecutively for thyroid surgery.; Type of surgery, indications, perioperative calcium levels, symptoms of hypocalcaemia and histology were documented.; Fifty-four patients underwent thyroid lobectomy and isthmusectomy, 19 underwent total and 13 completion thyroidectomy. Significantly, no patient undergoing thyroid lobectomy developed hypocalcaemia versus 26% of total thyroidectomies (P=0.001) and 23% of completion thyroidectomies (P=0.006). All eight patients with hypocalcaemia required treatment. Seven were initially identified clinically. Logistic regression analysis revealed that operation type was the only independent risk factor for developing hypocalcaemia (P=0.021).; No patient developed hypocalcaemia following thyroid lobectomy and isthmusectomy. Considering the majority (63%) of thyroid surgeries were lobectomies, most patients tested appear low risk for hypocalcaemia. Definitive prediction of hypocalcaemia postoperatively remains a challenge. However, our results suggest that analysing calcium levels routinely following thyroid lobectomy is unwarranted.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Calcium; Female; Humans; Hypocalcemia; Incidence; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Postoperative Complications; Prospective Studies; Thyroid Diseases; Thyroidectomy
ISSN:
1749-4486

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, E Men
dc.contributor.authorNeary, P Men
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, O Jen
dc.contributor.authorShafiq, Aen
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jen
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T14:50:10Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-24T14:50:10Z-
dc.date.issued2010-12-
dc.identifier.citationRoutine calcium measurement is not necessary after most thyroid surgeries: a prospective clinical study. 2010, 35 (6):468-73 Clin Otolaryngolen
dc.identifier.issn1749-4486-
dc.identifier.pmid21199407-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1749-4486.2010.02222.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/131878-
dc.description.abstractCalcium levels are often measured to diagnose postoperative hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy. The aims of this study were to (i) prospectively determine the incidence of symptomatic and biochemical hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy, (ii) to identify if any associations exist between hypocalcaemia, type of surgery, histological diagnosis, specimen size/weight and the presence of histological parathyroid tissue and (iii) to evaluate the necessity of routine measurement of calcium levels following all thyroidectomies.-
dc.description.abstractProspective clinical study.-
dc.description.abstractUniversity teaching hospital.-
dc.description.abstractEighty-six patients presenting consecutively for thyroid surgery.-
dc.description.abstractType of surgery, indications, perioperative calcium levels, symptoms of hypocalcaemia and histology were documented.-
dc.description.abstractFifty-four patients underwent thyroid lobectomy and isthmusectomy, 19 underwent total and 13 completion thyroidectomy. Significantly, no patient undergoing thyroid lobectomy developed hypocalcaemia versus 26% of total thyroidectomies (P=0.001) and 23% of completion thyroidectomies (P=0.006). All eight patients with hypocalcaemia required treatment. Seven were initially identified clinically. Logistic regression analysis revealed that operation type was the only independent risk factor for developing hypocalcaemia (P=0.021).-
dc.description.abstractNo patient developed hypocalcaemia following thyroid lobectomy and isthmusectomy. Considering the majority (63%) of thyroid surgeries were lobectomies, most patients tested appear low risk for hypocalcaemia. Definitive prediction of hypocalcaemia postoperatively remains a challenge. However, our results suggest that analysing calcium levels routinely following thyroid lobectomy is unwarranted.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21199407en
dc.subject.meshCalcium-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypocalcemia-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshThyroid Diseases-
dc.subject.meshThyroidectomy-
dc.titleRoutine calcium measurement is not necessary after most thyroid surgeries: a prospective clinical study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Academic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. edelquinn@rcsi.ieen
dc.identifier.journalClinical otolaryngology : official journal of ENT-UK ; official journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgeryen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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