Childbirth: life event or start of a long-term difficulty? Further data from the Stoke-on-Trent controlled study of postnatal depression.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/129669
Title:
Childbirth: life event or start of a long-term difficulty? Further data from the Stoke-on-Trent controlled study of postnatal depression.
Authors:
Murray, D; Cox, J L; Chapman, G; Jones, P
Affiliation:
St Ita's Hospital, Portrane, Co. Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Childbirth: life event or start of a long-term difficulty? Further data from the Stoke-on-Trent controlled study of postnatal depression. 1995, 166 (5):595-600 Br J Psychiatry
Journal:
The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
Issue Date:
May-1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/129669
PubMed ID:
7620743
Abstract:
This paper reports further data from the Stoke study of postnatal depression and examines whether psychosocial characteristics and symptom profiles differ between postnatal and control depression.; Two hundred and thirty-two postnatal and non-postnatal control women were screened with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale; all high scorers and a sample of low scores were interviewed with the Standardised Psychiatric Interview and modified Social Maladjustment Schedule. Depression was diagnosed using the Research Diagnostic Criteria.; Postnatal but not control depression was associated with a poor relationship with the woman's own mother and greater occupational instability. Depression in control women was associated with low income, having three or more children, performing manual work and occupational dissatisfaction, but postnatal depression was not. There were no differences in the symptom profiles of the postnatal and control women nor between early and late onset postnatal depression.; Depression is a common and socially disabling disorder affecting mothers of young children. Postnatal depression is more contingent on acute biopsychosocial stresses caused by the arrival of a new family member. Depression in women with older children is more closely related to longer term social adversity.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depressive Disorder; England; Family Characteristics; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Incidence; Life Change Events; Parenting; Personality Assessment; Psychosocial Deprivation; Puerperal Disorders; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors
ISSN:
0007-1250

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Den
dc.contributor.authorCox, J Len
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Gen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Pen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-17T07:28:02Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-17T07:28:02Z-
dc.date.issued1995-05-
dc.identifier.citationChildbirth: life event or start of a long-term difficulty? Further data from the Stoke-on-Trent controlled study of postnatal depression. 1995, 166 (5):595-600 Br J Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1250-
dc.identifier.pmid7620743-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/129669-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports further data from the Stoke study of postnatal depression and examines whether psychosocial characteristics and symptom profiles differ between postnatal and control depression.-
dc.description.abstractTwo hundred and thirty-two postnatal and non-postnatal control women were screened with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale; all high scorers and a sample of low scores were interviewed with the Standardised Psychiatric Interview and modified Social Maladjustment Schedule. Depression was diagnosed using the Research Diagnostic Criteria.-
dc.description.abstractPostnatal but not control depression was associated with a poor relationship with the woman's own mother and greater occupational instability. Depression in control women was associated with low income, having three or more children, performing manual work and occupational dissatisfaction, but postnatal depression was not. There were no differences in the symptom profiles of the postnatal and control women nor between early and late onset postnatal depression.-
dc.description.abstractDepression is a common and socially disabling disorder affecting mothers of young children. Postnatal depression is more contingent on acute biopsychosocial stresses caused by the arrival of a new family member. Depression in women with older children is more closely related to longer term social adversity.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder-
dc.subject.meshEngland-
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshLife Change Events-
dc.subject.meshParenting-
dc.subject.meshPersonality Assessment-
dc.subject.meshPsychosocial Deprivation-
dc.subject.meshPuerperal Disorders-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factors-
dc.titleChildbirth: life event or start of a long-term difficulty? Further data from the Stoke-on-Trent controlled study of postnatal depression.en
dc.contributor.departmentSt Ita's Hospital, Portrane, Co. Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental scienceen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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