Domestic and sexual violence services in Ireland: service provision and co-ordination

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/129549
Title:
Domestic and sexual violence services in Ireland: service provision and co-ordination
Authors:
COSC The National Office for the Prevention of Domestic, Sexual and Gender-based Violence
Publisher:
Department of Justice and Equality
Issue Date:
May-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/129549
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This summary of the report is for the convenience of the reader but any conclusion should not be drawn from it without reference to the relevant section of the report. The main purpose of this study was to secure an up-to-date understanding of how Ireland has been responding to domestic and sexual violence, with the most immediate objective of informing the development and implementation phases of the National Strategy on Domestic, Sexual and Gender-based Violence 2010-2014. The study aimed to address several issues regarding domestic and sexual violence service provision in Ireland. 1. What services are available to victims of domestic and sexual violence in Ireland? 2. How accessible are these services? This involves not only the issue of location but also whether services can provide for people who differ in terms of need? 3. Is the system of service response consistent and integrated? Among others, this examines the extent of co-ordination involved among the services in the sector (both NGO and State) and what issues need to be considered if the current system of response is to be strengthened. The research was conducted in two principal phases and involved the use of mixed methods. The first phase mainly used existing data sources to examine the range and accessibility of services in Ireland, practically all of which receive core funding from the Health Service Executive. Of central importance to this phase of the study were data sets received from SAFE Ireland and the RCNI. The data sets were for 2007, which was the latest year for which full data sets were available at the fieldwork stage of the study. The second phase adopted a qualitative research methodology and examined the development of co-ordination among State and non-State organisations and agencies involved in domestic and sexual violence related service provision.
Keywords:
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE; SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCOSC The National Office for the Prevention of Domestic, Sexual and Gender-based Violenceen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-13T15:17:23Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-13T15:17:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-05-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/129549-
dc.descriptionThis summary of the report is for the convenience of the reader but any conclusion should not be drawn from it without reference to the relevant section of the report. The main purpose of this study was to secure an up-to-date understanding of how Ireland has been responding to domestic and sexual violence, with the most immediate objective of informing the development and implementation phases of the National Strategy on Domestic, Sexual and Gender-based Violence 2010-2014. The study aimed to address several issues regarding domestic and sexual violence service provision in Ireland. 1. What services are available to victims of domestic and sexual violence in Ireland? 2. How accessible are these services? This involves not only the issue of location but also whether services can provide for people who differ in terms of need? 3. Is the system of service response consistent and integrated? Among others, this examines the extent of co-ordination involved among the services in the sector (both NGO and State) and what issues need to be considered if the current system of response is to be strengthened. The research was conducted in two principal phases and involved the use of mixed methods. The first phase mainly used existing data sources to examine the range and accessibility of services in Ireland, practically all of which receive core funding from the Health Service Executive. Of central importance to this phase of the study were data sets received from SAFE Ireland and the RCNI. The data sets were for 2007, which was the latest year for which full data sets were available at the fieldwork stage of the study. The second phase adopted a qualitative research methodology and examined the development of co-ordination among State and non-State organisations and agencies involved in domestic and sexual violence related service provision.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Justice and Equalityen
dc.subjectDOMESTIC VIOLENCEen
dc.subjectSEXUAL VIOLENCEen
dc.titleDomestic and sexual violence services in Ireland: service provision and co-ordinationen
dc.typeReporten
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