Sonographic accuracy of twin fetal weight estimation in obese women: evidence from the National ESPRIT study [Poster]

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128796
Title:
Sonographic accuracy of twin fetal weight estimation in obese women: evidence from the National ESPRIT study [Poster]
Authors:
Breathnach, F M; Carroll, S.; McAuliffe, F.; Geary, M; Daly, S; Higgins, John R.; Dornan, J; Morrison, John; Burke, G; Higgins, S.; Malone, Fergal D
Affiliation:
Rotunda Hospital
Publisher:
Mobsy Inc.
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128796
Additional Links:
http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(09)01482-3/fulltext
Item Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE: The combined challenges of maternal obesity and multiple gestation test the sonographic accuracy of fetal weight estimation in the third trimester. We sought to determine the accuracy of fetal weight determination in twin gestations in accordance with maternal body mass index (BMI). STUDY DESIGN: The ESPRIT Trial is a national prospective population study of twin pregnancies managed and delivered at 8 tertiary referral centers in one country. All pregnancies were followed using a uniform sonographic surveillance protocol, which included 2-weekly sonographic determination of fetal weight in the third trimester. Fetal weight determined within 14 days of delivery was compared to actual birthweight and the associated error calculated. RESULTS: Body mass index was recorded at registration for 609 study participants at a median gestational age of 22 weeks. The median BMI was 24 kg/m2 at registration (range 18 –50kg/m2). Sonographic estimation of fetal weight was strongly predictive of birthweight, with a marginally better predicative ability for the presenting twin. There was no association between maternal BMI and the error in weight estimation of either the presenting twin (p-value 0.6757) or the non-presenting twin (p-value 0.9010). A multiple regression analysis of fetal weight estimation with BMI, gestational week at birth and ultrasound- to-delivery interval identified that weight of each twin was underestimated by less than 100 grams for each week of the ultrasoundto- delivery interval (p-value 0.0001). CONCLUSION: There is no evidence to suggest that increasing maternal obesity decreases the accuracy of sonographically determined fetal weight of either the presenting twin or its co-twin. Time lapse between ultrasound scan and birth was the main contributor to the discrepancy between estimated fetal weights and birthweights. With this taken into account, there remained some evidence to suggest an underestimation of the weight of the non-presenting twin weight with ultrasound.
Keywords:
MULTIPLE BIRTHS; BIRTHWEIGHT; PREGNANCY; OBESITY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBreathnach, F Men
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, S.en
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, F.en
dc.contributor.authorGeary, Men
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Sen
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, John R.en
dc.contributor.authorDornan, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Gen
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, S.en
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Fergal Den
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T15:03:15Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-27T15:03:15Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128796-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE: The combined challenges of maternal obesity and multiple gestation test the sonographic accuracy of fetal weight estimation in the third trimester. We sought to determine the accuracy of fetal weight determination in twin gestations in accordance with maternal body mass index (BMI). STUDY DESIGN: The ESPRIT Trial is a national prospective population study of twin pregnancies managed and delivered at 8 tertiary referral centers in one country. All pregnancies were followed using a uniform sonographic surveillance protocol, which included 2-weekly sonographic determination of fetal weight in the third trimester. Fetal weight determined within 14 days of delivery was compared to actual birthweight and the associated error calculated. RESULTS: Body mass index was recorded at registration for 609 study participants at a median gestational age of 22 weeks. The median BMI was 24 kg/m2 at registration (range 18 –50kg/m2). Sonographic estimation of fetal weight was strongly predictive of birthweight, with a marginally better predicative ability for the presenting twin. There was no association between maternal BMI and the error in weight estimation of either the presenting twin (p-value 0.6757) or the non-presenting twin (p-value 0.9010). A multiple regression analysis of fetal weight estimation with BMI, gestational week at birth and ultrasound- to-delivery interval identified that weight of each twin was underestimated by less than 100 grams for each week of the ultrasoundto- delivery interval (p-value 0.0001). CONCLUSION: There is no evidence to suggest that increasing maternal obesity decreases the accuracy of sonographically determined fetal weight of either the presenting twin or its co-twin. Time lapse between ultrasound scan and birth was the main contributor to the discrepancy between estimated fetal weights and birthweights. With this taken into account, there remained some evidence to suggest an underestimation of the weight of the non-presenting twin weight with ultrasound.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMobsy Inc.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(09)01482-3/fulltexten
dc.subjectMULTIPLE BIRTHSen
dc.subjectBIRTHWEIGHTen
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen
dc.subjectOBESITYen
dc.titleSonographic accuracy of twin fetal weight estimation in obese women: evidence from the National ESPRIT study [Poster]en
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentRotunda Hospitalen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
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