Ethnicity, social disadvantage and psychotic-like experiences in a healthy population based sample.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128759
Title:
Ethnicity, social disadvantage and psychotic-like experiences in a healthy population based sample.
Authors:
Morgan, C; Fisher, H; Hutchinson, G; Kirkbride, J; Craig, T K; Morgan, K; Dazzan, P; Boydell, J; Doody, G A; Jones, P B; Murray, R M; Leff, J; Fearon, P
Affiliation:
NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Health Service, England, UK. spjucrm@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Citation:
Ethnicity, social disadvantage and psychotic-like experiences in a healthy population based sample. 2009, 119 (3):226-35 Acta Psychiatr Scand
Journal:
Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica
Issue Date:
Mar-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128759
DOI:
10.1111/j.1600-0447.2008.01301.x
PubMed ID:
19053965
Additional Links:
DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2008.01301.x
Abstract:
We sought to investigate the prevalence and social correlates of psychotic-like experiences in a general population sample of Black and White British subjects.; Data were collected from randomly selected community control subjects, recruited as part of the AESOP study, a three-centre population based study of first-episode psychosis.; The proportion of subjects reporting one or more psychotic-like experience was 19% (n = 72/372). These were more common in Black Caribbean (OR 2.08) and Black African subjects (OR 4.59), compared with White British. In addition, a number of indicators of childhood and adult disadvantage were associated with psychotic-like experiences. When these variables were simultaneously entered into a regression model, Black African ethnicity, concentrated adult disadvantage, and separation from parents retained a significant effect.; The higher prevalence of psychotic-like experiences in the Black Caribbean, but not Black African, group was explained by high levels of social disadvantage over the life course.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group; Case-Control Studies; Cross-Cultural Comparison; Cross-Sectional Studies; Delusions; England; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Hallucinations; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Life Change Events; Male; Maternal Deprivation; Middle Aged; Paternal Deprivation; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Psychosocial Deprivation; Psychotic Disorders; Risk Factors; Social Isolation; Social Support; Young Adult
ISSN:
1600-0447

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Cen
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Hen
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Gen
dc.contributor.authorKirkbride, Jen
dc.contributor.authorCraig, T Ken
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Ken
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Pen
dc.contributor.authorBoydell, Jen
dc.contributor.authorDoody, G Aen
dc.contributor.authorJones, P Ben
dc.contributor.authorMurray, R Men
dc.contributor.authorLeff, Jen
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Pen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T11:15:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-27T11:15:22Z-
dc.date.issued2009-03-
dc.identifier.citationEthnicity, social disadvantage and psychotic-like experiences in a healthy population based sample. 2009, 119 (3):226-35 Acta Psychiatr Scanden
dc.identifier.issn1600-0447-
dc.identifier.pmid19053965-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0447.2008.01301.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128759-
dc.description.abstractWe sought to investigate the prevalence and social correlates of psychotic-like experiences in a general population sample of Black and White British subjects.-
dc.description.abstractData were collected from randomly selected community control subjects, recruited as part of the AESOP study, a three-centre population based study of first-episode psychosis.-
dc.description.abstractThe proportion of subjects reporting one or more psychotic-like experience was 19% (n = 72/372). These were more common in Black Caribbean (OR 2.08) and Black African subjects (OR 4.59), compared with White British. In addition, a number of indicators of childhood and adult disadvantage were associated with psychotic-like experiences. When these variables were simultaneously entered into a regression model, Black African ethnicity, concentrated adult disadvantage, and separation from parents retained a significant effect.-
dc.description.abstractThe higher prevalence of psychotic-like experiences in the Black Caribbean, but not Black African, group was explained by high levels of social disadvantage over the life course.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlDOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2008.01301.xen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAfrican Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparison-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshDelusions-
dc.subject.meshEngland-
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHallucinations-
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshLife Change Events-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMaternal Deprivation-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPaternal Deprivation-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales-
dc.subject.meshPsychosocial Deprivation-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSocial Isolation-
dc.subject.meshSocial Support-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleEthnicity, social disadvantage and psychotic-like experiences in a healthy population based sample.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Health Service, England, UK. spjucrm@iop.kcl.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalActa psychiatrica Scandinavicaen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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