The prevalence, diagnostic significance and demographic characteristics of Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128754
Title:
The prevalence, diagnostic significance and demographic characteristics of Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses.
Authors:
Ihara, Kazushige; Morgan, Craig; Fearon, Paul; Dazzan, Paola; Demjaha, Arsime; Lloyd, Tuhina; Kirkbride, James B; Hayhurst, Hazel; Murray, Robin M; Jones, Peter B
Affiliation:
Department of Social Medicine, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
Citation:
The prevalence, diagnostic significance and demographic characteristics of Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses. 2009, 42 (2):81-91 Psychopathology
Journal:
Psychopathology
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128754
DOI:
10.1159/000203340
PubMed ID:
19225242
Additional Links:
DOI: 10.1159/000203340
Abstract:
The diagnostic significance of first-rank symptoms (FRSs) remains uncertain. Ethnic differences in FRSs may account for high rates of schizophrenia in minority groups. This study aims to examine the prevalence of FRSs in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses stratified by relevant demographic variables. SAMPLING AND METHOD: We identified everyone aged 16-64 presenting with their first psychosis over 2 years in 3 UK centres.; A total of 426 subjects had consensus diagnoses of DSM-IV and ICD-10 psychotic conditions. Thirty-eight percent (95% CI=33-42) reported FRSs; more frequent in those classified as having schizophrenia (DSM-IV: 55%, 95% CI=47-63; ICD-10: 51%, 95% CI=44-58) than those with affective psychoses (DSM-IV: 31%, 95% CI=22-39; ICD-10: 29%, 95% CI=21-38). FRSs in schizophrenia were more common in white British subjects, while in affective psychoses, they were more frequent in the black group. The sensitivities, specificities and positive predictive values for schizophrenia of FRSs were 55, 69 and 72% according to DSM-IV and 51, 71, 74% according to ICD-10, respectively. The sensitivities were higher in white British than in the black group.; FRSs were common but unhelpful for differentiating schizophrenia from other psychoses as they occurred frequently in both diagnoses. Phenomenological differences did not explain the higher incidence of schizophrenia in black ethnic minority groups.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Demography; Diagnosis, Differential; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Female; Humans; International Classification of Diseases; Male; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Psychotic Disorders; Schizophrenia; Severity of Illness Index; Young Adult
ISSN:
1423-033X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIhara, Kazushigeen
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorDemjaha, Arsimeen
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Tuhinaen
dc.contributor.authorKirkbride, James Ben
dc.contributor.authorHayhurst, Hazelen
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Robin Men
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peter Ben
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T11:03:38Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-27T11:03:38Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationThe prevalence, diagnostic significance and demographic characteristics of Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses. 2009, 42 (2):81-91 Psychopathologyen
dc.identifier.issn1423-033X-
dc.identifier.pmid19225242-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000203340-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128754-
dc.description.abstractThe diagnostic significance of first-rank symptoms (FRSs) remains uncertain. Ethnic differences in FRSs may account for high rates of schizophrenia in minority groups. This study aims to examine the prevalence of FRSs in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses stratified by relevant demographic variables. SAMPLING AND METHOD: We identified everyone aged 16-64 presenting with their first psychosis over 2 years in 3 UK centres.-
dc.description.abstractA total of 426 subjects had consensus diagnoses of DSM-IV and ICD-10 psychotic conditions. Thirty-eight percent (95% CI=33-42) reported FRSs; more frequent in those classified as having schizophrenia (DSM-IV: 55%, 95% CI=47-63; ICD-10: 51%, 95% CI=44-58) than those with affective psychoses (DSM-IV: 31%, 95% CI=22-39; ICD-10: 29%, 95% CI=21-38). FRSs in schizophrenia were more common in white British subjects, while in affective psychoses, they were more frequent in the black group. The sensitivities, specificities and positive predictive values for schizophrenia of FRSs were 55, 69 and 72% according to DSM-IV and 51, 71, 74% according to ICD-10, respectively. The sensitivities were higher in white British than in the black group.-
dc.description.abstractFRSs were common but unhelpful for differentiating schizophrenia from other psychoses as they occurred frequently in both diagnoses. Phenomenological differences did not explain the higher incidence of schizophrenia in black ethnic minority groups.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlDOI: 10.1159/000203340en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshDemography-
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differential-
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInternational Classification of Diseases-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia-
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Index-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleThe prevalence, diagnostic significance and demographic characteristics of Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Social Medicine, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.en
dc.identifier.journalPsychopathologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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