Residential mobility among individuals with severe mental illness: cohort study of UK700 participants.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128753
Title:
Residential mobility among individuals with severe mental illness: cohort study of UK700 participants.
Authors:
Tulloch, Alex D; Fearon, Paul; Fahy, Tom; David, Anthony
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, UK. a.tulloch@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Citation:
Residential mobility among individuals with severe mental illness: cohort study of UK700 participants. 2010, 45 (8):767-77 Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol
Journal:
Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
Issue Date:
Aug-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128753
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-009-0115-4
PubMed ID:
19685194
Additional Links:
DOI: 10.1007/s00127-009-0115-4
Abstract:
There is limited research concerning residential mobility among people with severe mental illness.; To investigate residential mobility over 2 years among participants in the UK700 trial of intensive case management in severe mental illness.; Cohort study.; Over 60% of participants had recently wanted to move or improve their accommodation but this was not associated with mobility. Mobility was strongly associated with younger age and drug and alcohol misuse and weakly associated with being unmarried and needs relating to a benefit claim. Among those likely to have been living in supported housing, mobility was also associated with being able to look after the home. Among those living independently, mobility was also associated with being an inpatient at randomisation.; Wanting to move did not predict mobility. This contrasts with findings in the general population. Several of the associations found are possibly due to forced mobility. The association with younger age is likely to represent voluntary mobility as in the general population.; Future studies of residential mobility in severe mental illness should make use of a wider range of methods and should draw on the general population literature.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Case Management; Cohort Studies; Female; Hospitalization; Humans; Independent Living; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Mental Disorders; Needs Assessment; Psychotic Disorders; Public Housing; Questionnaires; Residential Mobility; Severity of Illness Index; Substance-Related Disorders; Survival Analysis
ISSN:
1433-9285

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTulloch, Alex Den
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorFahy, Tomen
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Anthonyen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T11:02:00Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-27T11:02:00Z-
dc.date.issued2010-08-
dc.identifier.citationResidential mobility among individuals with severe mental illness: cohort study of UK700 participants. 2010, 45 (8):767-77 Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiolen
dc.identifier.issn1433-9285-
dc.identifier.pmid19685194-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-009-0115-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128753-
dc.description.abstractThere is limited research concerning residential mobility among people with severe mental illness.-
dc.description.abstractTo investigate residential mobility over 2 years among participants in the UK700 trial of intensive case management in severe mental illness.-
dc.description.abstractCohort study.-
dc.description.abstractOver 60% of participants had recently wanted to move or improve their accommodation but this was not associated with mobility. Mobility was strongly associated with younger age and drug and alcohol misuse and weakly associated with being unmarried and needs relating to a benefit claim. Among those likely to have been living in supported housing, mobility was also associated with being able to look after the home. Among those living independently, mobility was also associated with being an inpatient at randomisation.-
dc.description.abstractWanting to move did not predict mobility. This contrasts with findings in the general population. Several of the associations found are possibly due to forced mobility. The association with younger age is likely to represent voluntary mobility as in the general population.-
dc.description.abstractFuture studies of residential mobility in severe mental illness should make use of a wider range of methods and should draw on the general population literature.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlDOI: 10.1007/s00127-009-0115-4en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCase Management-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHospitalization-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIndependent Living-
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studies-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders-
dc.subject.meshNeeds Assessment-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.subject.meshPublic Housing-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshResidential Mobility-
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Index-
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disorders-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis-
dc.titleResidential mobility among individuals with severe mental illness: cohort study of UK700 participants.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, UK. a.tulloch@iop.kcl.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalSocial psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.