Differing patterns of brain structural abnormalities between black and white patients with their first episode of psychosis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128751
Title:
Differing patterns of brain structural abnormalities between black and white patients with their first episode of psychosis.
Authors:
Morgan, K D; Dazzan, P; Morgan, C; Lappin, J; Hutchinson, G; Chitnis, X; Suckling, J; Fearon, P; Jones, P B; Leff, J; Murray, R M
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, London W1B 2UW, UK. k.d.morgan@wmin.ac.uk
Citation:
Differing patterns of brain structural abnormalities between black and white patients with their first episode of psychosis. 2010, 40 (7):1137-47 Psychol Med
Journal:
Psychological medicine
Issue Date:
Jul-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128751
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291709991565
PubMed ID:
19891807
Additional Links:
DOI: 10.1017/S0033291709991565
Abstract:
African-Caribbean and black African people living in the UK are reported to have a higher incidence of diagnosed psychosis compared with white British people. It has been argued that this may be a consequence of misdiagnosis. If this is true they might be less likely to show the patterns of structural brain abnormalities reported in white British patients. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate whether there are differences in the prevalence of structural brain abnormalities in white and black first-episode psychosis patients.; We obtained dual-echo (proton density/T2-weighted) images from a sample of 75 first-episode psychosis patients and 68 healthy controls. We used high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based methods of image analysis. Two separate analyses were conducted: (1) 34 white British patients were compared with 33 white British controls; (2) 41 African-Caribbean and black African patients were compared with 35 African-Caribbean and black African controls.; White British patients and African-Caribbean/black African patients had ventricular enlargement and increased lenticular nucleus volume compared with their respective ethnic controls. The African-Caribbean/black African patients also showed reduced global grey matter and increased lingual gyrus grey-matter volume. The white British patients had no regional or global grey-matter loss compared with their normal ethnic counterparts but showed increased grey matter in the left superior temporal lobe and right parahippocampal gyrus.; We found no evidence in support of our hypothesis. Indeed, the finding of reduced global grey-matter volume in the African-Caribbean/black African patients but not in the white British patients was contrary to our prediction.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group; Brain; Caribbean Region; Cerebral Ventricles; Corpus Striatum; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Great Britain; Humans; Incidence; International Classification of Diseases; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Prevalence; Psychotic Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders
ISSN:
1469-8978

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, K Den
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Pen
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Cen
dc.contributor.authorLappin, Jen
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Gen
dc.contributor.authorChitnis, Xen
dc.contributor.authorSuckling, Jen
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Pen
dc.contributor.authorJones, P Ben
dc.contributor.authorLeff, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMurray, R Men
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T10:53:24Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-27T10:53:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010-07-
dc.identifier.citationDiffering patterns of brain structural abnormalities between black and white patients with their first episode of psychosis. 2010, 40 (7):1137-47 Psychol Meden
dc.identifier.issn1469-8978-
dc.identifier.pmid19891807-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291709991565-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128751-
dc.description.abstractAfrican-Caribbean and black African people living in the UK are reported to have a higher incidence of diagnosed psychosis compared with white British people. It has been argued that this may be a consequence of misdiagnosis. If this is true they might be less likely to show the patterns of structural brain abnormalities reported in white British patients. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate whether there are differences in the prevalence of structural brain abnormalities in white and black first-episode psychosis patients.-
dc.description.abstractWe obtained dual-echo (proton density/T2-weighted) images from a sample of 75 first-episode psychosis patients and 68 healthy controls. We used high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based methods of image analysis. Two separate analyses were conducted: (1) 34 white British patients were compared with 33 white British controls; (2) 41 African-Caribbean and black African patients were compared with 35 African-Caribbean and black African controls.-
dc.description.abstractWhite British patients and African-Caribbean/black African patients had ventricular enlargement and increased lenticular nucleus volume compared with their respective ethnic controls. The African-Caribbean/black African patients also showed reduced global grey matter and increased lingual gyrus grey-matter volume. The white British patients had no regional or global grey-matter loss compared with their normal ethnic counterparts but showed increased grey matter in the left superior temporal lobe and right parahippocampal gyrus.-
dc.description.abstractWe found no evidence in support of our hypothesis. Indeed, the finding of reduced global grey-matter volume in the African-Caribbean/black African patients but not in the white British patients was contrary to our prediction.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlDOI: 10.1017/S0033291709991565en
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAfrican Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshBrain-
dc.subject.meshCaribbean Region-
dc.subject.meshCerebral Ventricles-
dc.subject.meshCorpus Striatum-
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshInternational Classification of Diseases-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disorders-
dc.titleDiffering patterns of brain structural abnormalities between black and white patients with their first episode of psychosis.en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Westminster, London W1B 2UW, UK. k.d.morgan@wmin.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalPsychological medicineen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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