Gender differences in the association between childhood abuse and psychosis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128744
Title:
Gender differences in the association between childhood abuse and psychosis.
Authors:
Fisher, Helen; Morgan, Craig; Dazzan, Paola; Craig, Thomas K; Morgan, Kevin; Hutchinson, Gerard; Jones, Peter B; Doody, Gillian A; Pariante, Carmine; McGuffin, Peter; Murray, Robin M; Leff, Julian; Fearon, Paul
Affiliation:
PO 80, Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. h.fisher@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Citation:
Gender differences in the association between childhood abuse and psychosis. 2009, 194 (4):319-25 Br J Psychiatry
Journal:
The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
Issue Date:
Apr-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128744
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.107.047985
PubMed ID:
19336782
Additional Links:
doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.107.047985
Abstract:
Studies demonstrating an association between childhood trauma and psychosis in adulthood have not systematically explored gender differences.; To investigate gender differences in the prevalence of childhood sexual and physical abuse among people with psychosis in comparison with healthy controls.; The Childhood Experiences of Care and Abuse Questionnaire was completed to elicit experiences of sexual and physical abuse during childhood in first-episode psychosis cases and population-based controls.; Among women, those in the cases group were twice as likely to report either physical or sexual abuse compared with controls following adjustment for all confounders. In particular, the effect of physical abuse in women was stronger and more robust than that for sexual abuse. A similar trend was found for psychotic-like experiences in the female control group. No association was found in men.; Reports of severe childhood physical or sexual abuse were associated with psychosis in women but not in men.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Battered Women; Case-Control Studies; Child; Child Abuse; Crime Victims; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Psychotic Disorders; Questionnaires; Sex Factors; Sex Offenses; Young Adult
ISSN:
1472-1465

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorCraig, Thomas Ken
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Kevinen
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Gerarden
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peter Ben
dc.contributor.authorDoody, Gillian Aen
dc.contributor.authorPariante, Carmineen
dc.contributor.authorMcGuffin, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Robin Men
dc.contributor.authorLeff, Julianen
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T11:05:14Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-27T11:05:14Z-
dc.date.issued2009-04-
dc.identifier.citationGender differences in the association between childhood abuse and psychosis. 2009, 194 (4):319-25 Br J Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn1472-1465-
dc.identifier.pmid19336782-
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.bp.107.047985-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128744-
dc.description.abstractStudies demonstrating an association between childhood trauma and psychosis in adulthood have not systematically explored gender differences.-
dc.description.abstractTo investigate gender differences in the prevalence of childhood sexual and physical abuse among people with psychosis in comparison with healthy controls.-
dc.description.abstractThe Childhood Experiences of Care and Abuse Questionnaire was completed to elicit experiences of sexual and physical abuse during childhood in first-episode psychosis cases and population-based controls.-
dc.description.abstractAmong women, those in the cases group were twice as likely to report either physical or sexual abuse compared with controls following adjustment for all confounders. In particular, the effect of physical abuse in women was stronger and more robust than that for sexual abuse. A similar trend was found for psychotic-like experiences in the female control group. No association was found in men.-
dc.description.abstractReports of severe childhood physical or sexual abuse were associated with psychosis in women but not in men.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urldoi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.107.047985en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBattered Women-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild Abuse-
dc.subject.meshCrime Victims-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.subject.meshSex Offenses-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleGender differences in the association between childhood abuse and psychosis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPO 80, Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. h.fisher@iop.kcl.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental scienceen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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