The varying impact of type, timing and frequency of exposure to childhood adversity on its association with adult psychotic disorder.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128741
Title:
The varying impact of type, timing and frequency of exposure to childhood adversity on its association with adult psychotic disorder.
Authors:
Fisher, H L; Jones, P B; Fearon, P; Craig, T K; Dazzan, P; Morgan, K; Hutchinson, G; Doody, G A; McGuffin, P; Leff, J; Murray, R M; Morgan, C
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK. helen.fisher@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Citation:
The varying impact of type, timing and frequency of exposure to childhood adversity on its association with adult psychotic disorder. 2010, 40 (12):1967-78 Psychol Med
Journal:
Psychological medicine
Issue Date:
Dec-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128741
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291710000231
PubMed ID:
20178679
Additional Links:
DOI: 10.1017/S0033291710000231
Abstract:
Childhood adversity has been associated with onset of psychosis in adulthood but these studies have used only general definitions of this environmental risk indicator. Therefore, we sought to explore the prevalence of more specific adverse childhood experiences amongst those with and without psychotic disorders using detailed assessments in a large epidemiological case-control sample (AESOP).; Data were collected on 182 first-presentation psychosis cases and 246 geographically matched controls in two UK centres. Information relating to the timing and frequency of exposure to different types of childhood adversity (neglect, antipathy, physical and sexual abuse, local authority care, disrupted living arrangements and lack of supportive figure) was obtained using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire.; Psychosis cases were three times more likely to report severe physical abuse from the mother that commenced prior to 12 years of age, even after adjustment for other significant forms of adversity and demographic confounders. A non-significant trend was also evident for greater prevalence of reported severe maternal antipathy amongst those with psychosis. Associations with maternal neglect and childhood sexual abuse disappeared after adjusting for maternal physical abuse and antipathy. Paternal maltreatment and other forms of adversity were not associated with psychosis nor was there evidence of a dose-response effect.; These findings suggest that only specific adverse childhood experiences are associated with psychotic disorders and only in a minority of cases. If replicated, this greater precision will ensure that research into the mechanisms underlying the pathway from childhood adversity to psychosis is more fruitful.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Case-Control Studies; Child; Child Abuse; Female; Great Britain; Humans; Male; Mother-Child Relations; Prevalence; Psychotic Disorders
ISSN:
1469-8978

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFisher, H Len
dc.contributor.authorJones, P Ben
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Pen
dc.contributor.authorCraig, T Ken
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Pen
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Ken
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Gen
dc.contributor.authorDoody, G Aen
dc.contributor.authorMcGuffin, Pen
dc.contributor.authorLeff, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMurray, R Men
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Cen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T10:39:31Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-27T10:39:31Z-
dc.date.issued2010-12-
dc.identifier.citationThe varying impact of type, timing and frequency of exposure to childhood adversity on its association with adult psychotic disorder. 2010, 40 (12):1967-78 Psychol Meden
dc.identifier.issn1469-8978-
dc.identifier.pmid20178679-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291710000231-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128741-
dc.description.abstractChildhood adversity has been associated with onset of psychosis in adulthood but these studies have used only general definitions of this environmental risk indicator. Therefore, we sought to explore the prevalence of more specific adverse childhood experiences amongst those with and without psychotic disorders using detailed assessments in a large epidemiological case-control sample (AESOP).-
dc.description.abstractData were collected on 182 first-presentation psychosis cases and 246 geographically matched controls in two UK centres. Information relating to the timing and frequency of exposure to different types of childhood adversity (neglect, antipathy, physical and sexual abuse, local authority care, disrupted living arrangements and lack of supportive figure) was obtained using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire.-
dc.description.abstractPsychosis cases were three times more likely to report severe physical abuse from the mother that commenced prior to 12 years of age, even after adjustment for other significant forms of adversity and demographic confounders. A non-significant trend was also evident for greater prevalence of reported severe maternal antipathy amongst those with psychosis. Associations with maternal neglect and childhood sexual abuse disappeared after adjusting for maternal physical abuse and antipathy. Paternal maltreatment and other forms of adversity were not associated with psychosis nor was there evidence of a dose-response effect.-
dc.description.abstractThese findings suggest that only specific adverse childhood experiences are associated with psychotic disorders and only in a minority of cases. If replicated, this greater precision will ensure that research into the mechanisms underlying the pathway from childhood adversity to psychosis is more fruitful.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlDOI: 10.1017/S0033291710000231en
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild Abuse-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMother-Child Relations-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.titleThe varying impact of type, timing and frequency of exposure to childhood adversity on its association with adult psychotic disorder.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK. helen.fisher@iop.kcl.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalPsychological medicineen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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