Insight, grey matter and cognitive function in first-onset psychosis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128727
Title:
Insight, grey matter and cognitive function in first-onset psychosis.
Authors:
Morgan, Kevin D; Dazzan, Paola; Morgan, Craig; Lappin, Julia; Hutchinson, Gerard; Suckling, John; Fearon, Paul; Jones, Peter B; Leff, Julian; Murray, Robin M; David, Anthony S
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW, UK. k.d.morgan@westminster.ac.uk
Citation:
Insight, grey matter and cognitive function in first-onset psychosis. 2010, 197:141-8 Br J Psychiatry
Journal:
The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
Issue Date:
Aug-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/128727
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.109.070888
PubMed ID:
20679268
Abstract:
Several studies have suggested that neuropsychological and structural brain deficits are implicated in poor insight. Few insight studies however have combined neurocognitive and structural neuroanatomical measures.; Focusing on the ability to relabel psychotic symptoms as pathological, we examined insight, brain structure and neurocognition in first-onset psychosis.; Voxel-based magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 82 individuals with psychosis and 91 controls assessed with a brief neuropsychological test battery. Insight was measured using the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight.; The principal analysis showed reduced general neuropsychological function was linked to poor symptom relabelling ability. A subsequent between-psychosis group analysis found those with no symptom relabelling ability had significant global and regional grey matter deficits primarily located at the posterior cingulate gyrus and right precuneus/cuneus.; The cingulate gyrus (as part of a midline cortical system) along with right hemisphere regions may be involved in illness and symptom self-appraisal in first-onset psychosis.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Brain; Brain Mapping; Case-Control Studies; Cerebral Ventricles; Cognition; Female; Gyrus Cinguli; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Neuropsychological Tests; Schizophrenia; Schizophrenic Psychology; Young Adult
ISSN:
1472-1465

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Kevin Den
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorLappin, Juliaen
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Gerarden
dc.contributor.authorSuckling, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peter Ben
dc.contributor.authorLeff, Julianen
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Robin Men
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Anthony Sen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T10:38:05Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-27T10:38:05Z-
dc.date.issued2010-08-
dc.identifier.citationInsight, grey matter and cognitive function in first-onset psychosis. 2010, 197:141-8 Br J Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn1472-1465-
dc.identifier.pmid20679268-
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.bp.109.070888-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128727-
dc.description.abstractSeveral studies have suggested that neuropsychological and structural brain deficits are implicated in poor insight. Few insight studies however have combined neurocognitive and structural neuroanatomical measures.-
dc.description.abstractFocusing on the ability to relabel psychotic symptoms as pathological, we examined insight, brain structure and neurocognition in first-onset psychosis.-
dc.description.abstractVoxel-based magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 82 individuals with psychosis and 91 controls assessed with a brief neuropsychological test battery. Insight was measured using the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight.-
dc.description.abstractThe principal analysis showed reduced general neuropsychological function was linked to poor symptom relabelling ability. A subsequent between-psychosis group analysis found those with no symptom relabelling ability had significant global and regional grey matter deficits primarily located at the posterior cingulate gyrus and right precuneus/cuneus.-
dc.description.abstractThe cingulate gyrus (as part of a midline cortical system) along with right hemisphere regions may be involved in illness and symptom self-appraisal in first-onset psychosis.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshBrain-
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshCerebral Ventricles-
dc.subject.meshCognition-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGyrus Cinguli-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Tests-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenic Psychology-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleInsight, grey matter and cognitive function in first-onset psychosis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW, UK. k.d.morgan@westminster.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental scienceen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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