Emergency nurses experiences of family witnessed resuscitation in an Irish general hospital setting: a qualitative study [thesis by Wayne Thompson]

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127944
Title:
Emergency nurses experiences of family witnessed resuscitation in an Irish general hospital setting: a qualitative study [thesis by Wayne Thompson]
Authors:
Thompson, Wayne
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Publisher:
Waterford Institute of Technology
Issue Date:
16-Jun-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127944
Item Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
The purpose of this study was to explore emergency nurses experiences of family witnessed resuscitation. A qualitative method was utilised in the study. A Husserlian phenomenological approach was chosen as its reductionist approach of ‘bracketing’ was congruent with the study’s purpose. Seven nurses with a minimum of six months clinical experience working in the emergency setting provided their experiences of family witnessed resuscitation during a semi-structured face to face interview. Themes and subthemes were gathered from the analysis of these interviews with the aid of the Colaizzi framework. Four themes emerged: (I) barriers to family witnessed resuscitation (II) facilitators to family witnessed resuscitation (III) experiences of family witnessed resuscitation (IV) judging situations and feelings concerning guidelines and policies. Findings show that nurses believe from their experiences of family witnessed resuscitation that space constraints, inappropriate staff levels, relatives becoming emotional and distracting the resuscitation team act as barriers to the practice. Regardless of these barriers the majority of nurses believe that family presence facilitates the grieving process, aids decision making and gives family comfort in knowing and seeing that all is being done for their loved ones. It was also found from the study that nurses experiences showed that the practice of family witnessed resuscitation helped staff strengthen relationships and empathise with patient and family. Certain situations were also found as to when family presence was most suitable, they being the patients age, the suddenness of the event, and the condition of the patient as well as the relatives medical knowledge. The majority of participants were in support of policy development as they believed it would serve as some direction when practicing family presence. From their experiences they believed it would facilitate greater understanding of the practice amongst health care professionals. Qualitative findings revealed that personal, organisational and social factors influence nurses towards the practice of family witnessed resuscitation. Nursing staff are committed to changing their practice which can be seen in the findings of this study and previously published studies which indicate the need for development of written policies and guidelines on the practice to meet the needs of patients, families, and staff by providing consistent, safe, and caring practices for all involved in the resuscitation process. Written policies or guidelines for family presence during resuscitation and invasive procedures are recommended and it must be noted that the opinions and experiences of health care professionals should be considered when developing these guidelines.
Keywords:
RESEARCH; EMERGENCY SERVICES; EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE; NURSE; FAMILY
Local subject classification:
RESUCITATION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Wayneen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-11T14:18:31Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-11T14:18:31Z-
dc.date.issued2008-06-16-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127944-
dc.descriptionThe purpose of this study was to explore emergency nurses experiences of family witnessed resuscitation. A qualitative method was utilised in the study. A Husserlian phenomenological approach was chosen as its reductionist approach of ‘bracketing’ was congruent with the study’s purpose. Seven nurses with a minimum of six months clinical experience working in the emergency setting provided their experiences of family witnessed resuscitation during a semi-structured face to face interview. Themes and subthemes were gathered from the analysis of these interviews with the aid of the Colaizzi framework. Four themes emerged: (I) barriers to family witnessed resuscitation (II) facilitators to family witnessed resuscitation (III) experiences of family witnessed resuscitation (IV) judging situations and feelings concerning guidelines and policies. Findings show that nurses believe from their experiences of family witnessed resuscitation that space constraints, inappropriate staff levels, relatives becoming emotional and distracting the resuscitation team act as barriers to the practice. Regardless of these barriers the majority of nurses believe that family presence facilitates the grieving process, aids decision making and gives family comfort in knowing and seeing that all is being done for their loved ones. It was also found from the study that nurses experiences showed that the practice of family witnessed resuscitation helped staff strengthen relationships and empathise with patient and family. Certain situations were also found as to when family presence was most suitable, they being the patients age, the suddenness of the event, and the condition of the patient as well as the relatives medical knowledge. The majority of participants were in support of policy development as they believed it would serve as some direction when practicing family presence. From their experiences they believed it would facilitate greater understanding of the practice amongst health care professionals. Qualitative findings revealed that personal, organisational and social factors influence nurses towards the practice of family witnessed resuscitation. Nursing staff are committed to changing their practice which can be seen in the findings of this study and previously published studies which indicate the need for development of written policies and guidelines on the practice to meet the needs of patients, families, and staff by providing consistent, safe, and caring practices for all involved in the resuscitation process. Written policies or guidelines for family presence during resuscitation and invasive procedures are recommended and it must be noted that the opinions and experiences of health care professionals should be considered when developing these guidelines.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWaterford Institute of Technologyen
dc.subjectRESEARCHen
dc.subjectEMERGENCY SERVICESen
dc.subjectEMERGENCY MEDICAL CAREen
dc.subjectNURSEen
dc.subjectFAMILYen
dc.subject.otherRESUCITATIONen
dc.titleEmergency nurses experiences of family witnessed resuscitation in an Irish general hospital setting: a qualitative study [thesis by Wayne Thompson]en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
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