Iliopsoas abscess: a re-emerging clinical entity not to be forgotten.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127700
Title:
Iliopsoas abscess: a re-emerging clinical entity not to be forgotten.
Authors:
Al-Hilli, Z; Prichard, R S; Roche-Nagle, G; Deasy, J; McNamara, D A
Citation:
Iliopsoas abscess: a re-emerging clinical entity not to be forgotten. 2009, 102 (2):58-60 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Feb-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127700
PubMed ID:
19405324
Abstract:
Iliopsoas abscesses are relatively rare clinical entities. They present with subtle and non-specific symptoms and as a result the diagnosis is often delayed, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. With an increasing number of immunocompromised patients in the population the prevalence of this condition is set to rise. Therefore, early diagnosis and appropriate management remain a challenge for clinicians. We present three patients with iliopsoas abscesses, two of which were primary and one of which was secondary to Crohn's disease. The average age of patients was 59 years and both patients with primary psoas abscesses were male. All presented with non-specific symptoms. Psoas sign was present in only one patient. CT confirmed the diagnosis in all cases. Treatment consisted of appropriate antibiotic cover and associated percutaneous drainage. The psoas abscess that was secondary to underlying Crohn's disease was subsequently treated with surgical excision of the affected segment of bowel and lavage of the abscess cavity. A high index of suspicion is required to ensure the accurate and early diagnosis of this rare clinical entity. Abdominal CT scanning remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Management is with appropriate antibiotics and adequate drainage. This can be achieved by either percutaneous or surgical drainage. Such treatment can reduce the overall morbidity and mortality of this condition.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Female; Humans; Immunocompromised Host; Male; Psoas Abscess
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAl-Hilli, Zen
dc.contributor.authorPrichard, R Sen
dc.contributor.authorRoche-Nagle, Gen
dc.contributor.authorDeasy, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, D Aen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T11:58:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-07T11:58:58Z-
dc.date.issued2009-02-
dc.identifier.citationIliopsoas abscess: a re-emerging clinical entity not to be forgotten. 2009, 102 (2):58-60 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid19405324-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127700-
dc.description.abstractIliopsoas abscesses are relatively rare clinical entities. They present with subtle and non-specific symptoms and as a result the diagnosis is often delayed, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. With an increasing number of immunocompromised patients in the population the prevalence of this condition is set to rise. Therefore, early diagnosis and appropriate management remain a challenge for clinicians. We present three patients with iliopsoas abscesses, two of which were primary and one of which was secondary to Crohn's disease. The average age of patients was 59 years and both patients with primary psoas abscesses were male. All presented with non-specific symptoms. Psoas sign was present in only one patient. CT confirmed the diagnosis in all cases. Treatment consisted of appropriate antibiotic cover and associated percutaneous drainage. The psoas abscess that was secondary to underlying Crohn's disease was subsequently treated with surgical excision of the affected segment of bowel and lavage of the abscess cavity. A high index of suspicion is required to ensure the accurate and early diagnosis of this rare clinical entity. Abdominal CT scanning remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Management is with appropriate antibiotics and adequate drainage. This can be achieved by either percutaneous or surgical drainage. Such treatment can reduce the overall morbidity and mortality of this condition.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunocompromised Host-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPsoas Abscess-
dc.titleIliopsoas abscess: a re-emerging clinical entity not to be forgotten.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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