The effects of usual footwear on balance amongst elderly women attending a day hospital.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127696
Title:
The effects of usual footwear on balance amongst elderly women attending a day hospital.
Authors:
Horgan, N Frances; Crehan, Fiona; Bartlett, Emma; Keogan, Fiona; O'Grady, Anne Marie; Moore, Allan R; Donegan, Ciaran F; Curran, Martina
Affiliation:
School of Physiotherapy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. fhorgan@rcsi.ie
Citation:
The effects of usual footwear on balance amongst elderly women attending a day hospital. 2009, 38 (1):62-7 Age Ageing
Journal:
Age and ageing
Issue Date:
Jan-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127696
DOI:
10.1093/ageing/afn219
PubMed ID:
19001558
Additional Links:
http://jcm.asm.org/cgi/reprint/48/5/1839
Abstract:
to examine the effects of footwear on balance in a sample of older women attending a day hospital.; this was a crossover trial with a quasi-randomised allocation.; assessments took place in the geriatric day hospital.; a cohort of 100 older women aged 60 years and over attending a day hospital.; demographic data and a brief falls history were recorded. Participant's footwear was assessed using a footwear assessment form. A Berg Balance Scale (BBS) was completed under two conditions--shoes on and shoes off with order counter-balanced.; the mean BBS was 39.07 (SD 9.14) with shoes on and 36.54 (SD 10.39) with shoes off (P < 0.0001). Balance scores were significantly higher with shoes on for 10 of the 14 Berg subcategories. Lower barefoot BBS scores were associated with a greater beneficial effect of footwear on balance (P < 0.001). Shoe characteristics were not associated with change in the BBS score.; Wearing their own footwear significantly improved participants' balance compared to being barefoot. The greatest benefit of footwear was seen in those with the poorest balance. Further studies should investigate whether particular types of footwear are associated with greater benefit.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Accidental Falls; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cross-Over Studies; Day Care; Female; Geriatric Assessment; Humans; Middle Aged; Postural Balance; Risk Factors; Shoes
ISSN:
1468-2834

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHorgan, N Francesen
dc.contributor.authorCrehan, Fionaen
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Emmaen
dc.contributor.authorKeogan, Fionaen
dc.contributor.authorO'Grady, Anne Marieen
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Allan Ren
dc.contributor.authorDonegan, Ciaran Fen
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Martinaen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T11:33:28Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-07T11:33:28Z-
dc.date.issued2009-01-
dc.identifier.citationThe effects of usual footwear on balance amongst elderly women attending a day hospital. 2009, 38 (1):62-7 Age Ageingen
dc.identifier.issn1468-2834-
dc.identifier.pmid19001558-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ageing/afn219-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127696-
dc.description.abstractto examine the effects of footwear on balance in a sample of older women attending a day hospital.-
dc.description.abstractthis was a crossover trial with a quasi-randomised allocation.-
dc.description.abstractassessments took place in the geriatric day hospital.-
dc.description.abstracta cohort of 100 older women aged 60 years and over attending a day hospital.-
dc.description.abstractdemographic data and a brief falls history were recorded. Participant's footwear was assessed using a footwear assessment form. A Berg Balance Scale (BBS) was completed under two conditions--shoes on and shoes off with order counter-balanced.-
dc.description.abstractthe mean BBS was 39.07 (SD 9.14) with shoes on and 36.54 (SD 10.39) with shoes off (P < 0.0001). Balance scores were significantly higher with shoes on for 10 of the 14 Berg subcategories. Lower barefoot BBS scores were associated with a greater beneficial effect of footwear on balance (P < 0.001). Shoe characteristics were not associated with change in the BBS score.-
dc.description.abstractWearing their own footwear significantly improved participants' balance compared to being barefoot. The greatest benefit of footwear was seen in those with the poorest balance. Further studies should investigate whether particular types of footwear are associated with greater benefit.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jcm.asm.org/cgi/reprint/48/5/1839en
dc.subject.meshAccidental Falls-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshCross-Over Studies-
dc.subject.meshDay Care-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGeriatric Assessment-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPostural Balance-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshShoes-
dc.titleThe effects of usual footwear on balance amongst elderly women attending a day hospital.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Physiotherapy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. fhorgan@rcsi.ieen
dc.identifier.journalAge and ageingen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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