Medication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127687
Title:
Medication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system.
Authors:
Alrwisan, Adel; Ross, Jennifer; Williams, David
Affiliation:
The National Pharmacovigilance Centre, Saudi Food and Drug Authority, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, aarwisan@sfda.gov.sa.
Citation:
Medication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system. 2011:notEur J Clin Pharmacol
Journal:
European journal of clinical pharmacology
Issue Date:
15-Jan-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127687
DOI:
10.1007/s00228-010-0986-z
PubMed ID:
21240481
Abstract:
AIMS: Approximately 20% of deaths from adverse events are related to medication incidents, costing the NHS an additional £500 million annually. Less than 5% of adverse events are reported. This study aims to assess the reporting rate of medication incidents in NHS facilities in the north east of Scotland, and to describe the types and outcomes of reported incidents among different services. Furthermore, we wished to quantify the proportion of reported incidents according to the reporters' profession. METHODS: A retrospective description was made of medication incidents reported to an online reporting system (DATIX) over a 46-month-period (July 2005 to April 2009). Reports originated from acute and community hospitals, mental health, and primary care facilities. RESULTS: Over the study period there were 2,666 incidents reported with a mean monthly reporting rate of 78.2/month (SD±16.9). 6.1% of all incidents resulted in harm, with insulin being the most commonly implicated medication. Nearly three-quarters (74.2%, n=1,978) of total incidents originated from acute hospitals. Administration incidents were implicated in the majority of the reported medication incidents (59%), followed by prescribing (10.8%) and dispensing (9.9%), while the nondescript "other medication incidents" accounted for 20.3% of total incidents. The majority of reports were made by nursing and midwifery staff (80%), with medical and dental professionals reporting the lowest number of incidents (n=56, 2%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of medication incidents in this study were reported by nursing and midwifery staff, and were due to administration incidents. There is a clear need to elucidate the reasons for the limited contribution of the medical and dental professionals to reporting medication incidents.
Item Type:
Article In Press
ISSN:
1432-1041

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAlrwisan, Adelen
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T11:09:53Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-07T11:09:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-01-15-
dc.identifier.citationMedication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system. 2011:notEur J Clin Pharmacolen
dc.identifier.issn1432-1041-
dc.identifier.pmid21240481-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00228-010-0986-z-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127687-
dc.description.abstractAIMS: Approximately 20% of deaths from adverse events are related to medication incidents, costing the NHS an additional £500 million annually. Less than 5% of adverse events are reported. This study aims to assess the reporting rate of medication incidents in NHS facilities in the north east of Scotland, and to describe the types and outcomes of reported incidents among different services. Furthermore, we wished to quantify the proportion of reported incidents according to the reporters' profession. METHODS: A retrospective description was made of medication incidents reported to an online reporting system (DATIX) over a 46-month-period (July 2005 to April 2009). Reports originated from acute and community hospitals, mental health, and primary care facilities. RESULTS: Over the study period there were 2,666 incidents reported with a mean monthly reporting rate of 78.2/month (SD±16.9). 6.1% of all incidents resulted in harm, with insulin being the most commonly implicated medication. Nearly three-quarters (74.2%, n=1,978) of total incidents originated from acute hospitals. Administration incidents were implicated in the majority of the reported medication incidents (59%), followed by prescribing (10.8%) and dispensing (9.9%), while the nondescript "other medication incidents" accounted for 20.3% of total incidents. The majority of reports were made by nursing and midwifery staff (80%), with medical and dental professionals reporting the lowest number of incidents (n=56, 2%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of medication incidents in this study were reported by nursing and midwifery staff, and were due to administration incidents. There is a clear need to elucidate the reasons for the limited contribution of the medical and dental professionals to reporting medication incidents.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.titleMedication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system.en
dc.typeArticle In Pressen
dc.contributor.departmentThe National Pharmacovigilance Centre, Saudi Food and Drug Authority, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, aarwisan@sfda.gov.sa.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of clinical pharmacologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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