Use of surveillance data for prevention of healthcare-associated infection: risk adjustment and reporting dilemmas.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127664
Title:
Use of surveillance data for prevention of healthcare-associated infection: risk adjustment and reporting dilemmas.
Authors:
O'Neill, Eoghan; Humphreys, Hilary
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Use of surveillance data for prevention of healthcare-associated infection: risk adjustment and reporting dilemmas. 2009, 22 (4):359-63 Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis.
Journal:
Current opinion in infectious diseases
Issue Date:
Aug-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127664
DOI:
10.1097/QCO.0b013e32832d04c0
PubMed ID:
19474727
Abstract:
Healthcare-associated or nosocomial infection (HCAI) is of increasing importance to healthcare providers and the public. Surveillance is crucial but must be adjusted for risk, especially when used for interhospital comparisons or for public reporting.; Surveillance data are increasingly adjusted for risk factors for HCAI if meaningful comparisons are made between institutions or across national boundaries. Postdischarge surveillance is important in detecting those infections that may not present to the institution in which the original procedure occurred. Caution is urged when comparing data from two sources, for example, an active surveillance program and administrative datasets. The public reporting of HCAI rates can assist in improving the quality of healthcare, but to date there is little evidence that this is happening. In the United States, a number of states have introduced mandatory reporting of HCAIs, but there is considerable variation in what data are released, how these are reported and the rigor of the validation of the dataset.; The consumerization of healthcare requires a response from healthcare providers to engage with the public on how, when and what risk-adjusted surveillance data to release. Information campaigns are required to ensure the public understand any publicly released data and its limitations.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Cross Infection; Disease Notification; Health Facilities; Humans; Risk Adjustment; Sentinel Surveillance; United States
ISSN:
1535-3877

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Eoghanen
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, Hilaryen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T11:57:39Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-07T11:57:39Z-
dc.date.issued2009-08-
dc.identifier.citationUse of surveillance data for prevention of healthcare-associated infection: risk adjustment and reporting dilemmas. 2009, 22 (4):359-63 Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1535-3877-
dc.identifier.pmid19474727-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/QCO.0b013e32832d04c0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127664-
dc.description.abstractHealthcare-associated or nosocomial infection (HCAI) is of increasing importance to healthcare providers and the public. Surveillance is crucial but must be adjusted for risk, especially when used for interhospital comparisons or for public reporting.-
dc.description.abstractSurveillance data are increasingly adjusted for risk factors for HCAI if meaningful comparisons are made between institutions or across national boundaries. Postdischarge surveillance is important in detecting those infections that may not present to the institution in which the original procedure occurred. Caution is urged when comparing data from two sources, for example, an active surveillance program and administrative datasets. The public reporting of HCAI rates can assist in improving the quality of healthcare, but to date there is little evidence that this is happening. In the United States, a number of states have introduced mandatory reporting of HCAIs, but there is considerable variation in what data are released, how these are reported and the rigor of the validation of the dataset.-
dc.description.abstractThe consumerization of healthcare requires a response from healthcare providers to engage with the public on how, when and what risk-adjusted surveillance data to release. Information campaigns are required to ensure the public understand any publicly released data and its limitations.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshCross Infection-
dc.subject.meshDisease Notification-
dc.subject.meshHealth Facilities-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshRisk Adjustment-
dc.subject.meshSentinel Surveillance-
dc.subject.meshUnited States-
dc.titleUse of surveillance data for prevention of healthcare-associated infection: risk adjustment and reporting dilemmas.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Microbiology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalCurrent opinion in infectious diseasesen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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