Psychosis and autism: magnetic resonance imaging study of brain anatomy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127608
Title:
Psychosis and autism: magnetic resonance imaging study of brain anatomy.
Authors:
Toal, Fiona; Bloemen, Oswald J N; Deeley, Quinton; Tunstall, Nigel; Daly, Eileen M; Page, Lisa; Brammer, Michael J; Murphy, Kieran C; Murphy, Declan G M
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. fiona.toal@forensicare.vic.gov.au
Citation:
Psychosis and autism: magnetic resonance imaging study of brain anatomy. 2009, 194 (5):418-25 Br J Psychiatry
Journal:
The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
Issue Date:
May-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127608
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.107.049007
PubMed ID:
19407271
Additional Links:
http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/reprint/194/5/418
Abstract:
Autism-spectrum disorder is increasingly recognised, with recent studies estimating that 1% of children in South London are affected. However, the biology of comorbid mental health problems in people with autism-spectrum disorder is poorly understood.; To investigate the brain anatomy of people with autism-spectrum disorder with and without psychosis.; We used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and compared 30 adults with autism-spectrum disorder (14 with a history psychosis) and 16 healthy controls.; Compared with controls both autism-spectrum disorder groups had significantly less grey matter bilaterally in the temporal lobes and the cerebellum. In contrast, they had increased grey matter in striatal regions. However, those with psychosis also had a significant reduction in grey matter content of frontal and occipital regions. Contrary to our expectation, within autism-spectrum disorder, comparisons revealed that psychosis was associated with a reduction in grey matter of the right insular cortex and bilaterally in the cerebellum extending into the fusiform gyrus and the lingual gyrus.; The presence of neurodevelopmental abnormalities normally associated with autism-spectrum disorder might represent an alternative 'entry-point' into a final common pathway of psychosis.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Autistic Disorder; Brain; Brain Mapping; Humans; Intelligence Tests; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Psychotic Disorders; Risk Factors; Schizophrenia; Young Adult
ISSN:
1472-1465

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorToal, Fionaen
dc.contributor.authorBloemen, Oswald J Nen
dc.contributor.authorDeeley, Quintonen
dc.contributor.authorTunstall, Nigelen
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Eileen Men
dc.contributor.authorPage, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorBrammer, Michael Jen
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kieran Cen
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Declan G Men
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T08:03:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-07T08:03:22Z-
dc.date.issued2009-05-
dc.identifier.citationPsychosis and autism: magnetic resonance imaging study of brain anatomy. 2009, 194 (5):418-25 Br J Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn1472-1465-
dc.identifier.pmid19407271-
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.bp.107.049007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127608-
dc.description.abstractAutism-spectrum disorder is increasingly recognised, with recent studies estimating that 1% of children in South London are affected. However, the biology of comorbid mental health problems in people with autism-spectrum disorder is poorly understood.-
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the brain anatomy of people with autism-spectrum disorder with and without psychosis.-
dc.description.abstractWe used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and compared 30 adults with autism-spectrum disorder (14 with a history psychosis) and 16 healthy controls.-
dc.description.abstractCompared with controls both autism-spectrum disorder groups had significantly less grey matter bilaterally in the temporal lobes and the cerebellum. In contrast, they had increased grey matter in striatal regions. However, those with psychosis also had a significant reduction in grey matter content of frontal and occipital regions. Contrary to our expectation, within autism-spectrum disorder, comparisons revealed that psychosis was associated with a reduction in grey matter of the right insular cortex and bilaterally in the cerebellum extending into the fusiform gyrus and the lingual gyrus.-
dc.description.abstractThe presence of neurodevelopmental abnormalities normally associated with autism-spectrum disorder might represent an alternative 'entry-point' into a final common pathway of psychosis.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/reprint/194/5/418en
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAutistic Disorder-
dc.subject.meshBrain-
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIntelligence Tests-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titlePsychosis and autism: magnetic resonance imaging study of brain anatomy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. fiona.toal@forensicare.vic.gov.auen
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental scienceen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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