Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement in a Caucasian man.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127493
Title:
Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement in a Caucasian man.
Authors:
Hannon, M J; Behan, L A; Agha, A
Affiliation:
Academic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital/RCSI Medical School, Dublin 9, Ireland.
Citation:
Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement in a Caucasian man. 2009, 46 (Pt 5):423-5 Ann. Clin. Biochem.
Journal:
Annals of clinical biochemistry
Issue Date:
Sep-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127493
DOI:
10.1258/acb.2009.009012
PubMed ID:
19641011
Abstract:
Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is a potentially fatal complication of hyperthyroidism, more common in Asian races, which is defined by a massive intracellular flux of potassium. This leads to profound hypokalaemia and muscle paralysis. Although the paralysis is temporary, it may be lethal if not diagnosed and treated rapidly, as profound hypokalaemia may induce respiratory muscle paralysis or cardiac arrest. The condition is often misdiagnosed in the west due to its comparative rarity in Caucasians; however it is now increasingly described in Caucasians and is also being seen with increasing frequency in western hospitals due to increasing immigration and population mobility. Here we describe the case of a patient with panhypopituitarism due to a craniopharyngioma, who developed thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement. This disorder has been described in Asian subjects but, to our knowledge, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis secondary to excessive L-thyroxine replacement has never been described in Caucasians.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; European Continental Ancestry Group; Humans; Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis; Hypopituitarism; Male; Thyrotoxicosis; Thyroxine
ISSN:
1758-1001

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHannon, M Jen
dc.contributor.authorBehan, L Aen
dc.contributor.authorAgha, Aen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-06T14:37:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-06T14:37:57Z-
dc.date.issued2009-09-
dc.identifier.citationThyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement in a Caucasian man. 2009, 46 (Pt 5):423-5 Ann. Clin. Biochem.en
dc.identifier.issn1758-1001-
dc.identifier.pmid19641011-
dc.identifier.doi10.1258/acb.2009.009012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127493-
dc.description.abstractThyrotoxic periodic paralysis is a potentially fatal complication of hyperthyroidism, more common in Asian races, which is defined by a massive intracellular flux of potassium. This leads to profound hypokalaemia and muscle paralysis. Although the paralysis is temporary, it may be lethal if not diagnosed and treated rapidly, as profound hypokalaemia may induce respiratory muscle paralysis or cardiac arrest. The condition is often misdiagnosed in the west due to its comparative rarity in Caucasians; however it is now increasingly described in Caucasians and is also being seen with increasing frequency in western hospitals due to increasing immigration and population mobility. Here we describe the case of a patient with panhypopituitarism due to a craniopharyngioma, who developed thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement. This disorder has been described in Asian subjects but, to our knowledge, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis secondary to excessive L-thyroxine replacement has never been described in Caucasians.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypokalemic Periodic Paralysis-
dc.subject.meshHypopituitarism-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshThyrotoxicosis-
dc.subject.meshThyroxine-
dc.titleThyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement in a Caucasian man.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAcademic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital/RCSI Medical School, Dublin 9, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of clinical biochemistryen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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