Preventing surgical site infection. Where now?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127485
Title:
Preventing surgical site infection. Where now?
Authors:
Humphreys, H
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Microbiology, RCSI Education and Research Centre, Smurfit Building, Beaumont Hospital, PO Box 9063, Dublin 9, Ireland. hhumphreys@rcsi.ie
Citation:
Preventing surgical site infection. Where now? 2009, 73 (4):316-22 J. Hosp. Infect.
Journal:
The Journal of hospital infection
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127485
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2009.03.028
PubMed ID:
19700219
Abstract:
Surgical site infection (SSI) is increasingly recognised as a measure of the quality of patient care by surgeons, infection control practitioners, health planners and the public. There is increasing pressure to compare SSI rates between surgeons, institutions and countries. For this to be meaningful, data must be standardised and must include post-discharge surveillance (PDS) as many superficial SSIs do not present to the original institution. Further work is required to determine the best method of conducting PDS. In 2008 two important documents on SSI were published from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America/The Infectious Disease Society of America and the National Institute for Health and Clincal Excellence, UK. Both emphasise key aspects during the preoperative, operative and postoperative phases of patient care. In addition to effective interventions known to be important for some time, e.g. not shaving the surgical site until the day of the procedure, there is increasing emphasis on physiological parameters, e.g. blood glucose concentrations, oxygen tensions and body temperature. Laparoscopic procedures are increasingly associated with reduced SSI rates, and the screening and decontamination of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers is effective for certain surgical procedures but has to be balanced by cost and the risk of mupirocin resistance. Finally, there is a need to convert theory into practice by the rigorous application of SSI healthcare bundles. Recent studies suggest that, with a multidisciplinary approach, simple measures can be effective in reducing SSI rates.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Cross Infection; Humans; Infection Control; Patient Discharge; Population Surveillance; Postoperative Complications; Surgical Wound Infection
ISSN:
1532-2939

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, Hen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-06T14:16:12Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-06T14:16:12Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.identifier.citationPreventing surgical site infection. Where now? 2009, 73 (4):316-22 J. Hosp. Infect.en
dc.identifier.issn1532-2939-
dc.identifier.pmid19700219-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jhin.2009.03.028-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127485-
dc.description.abstractSurgical site infection (SSI) is increasingly recognised as a measure of the quality of patient care by surgeons, infection control practitioners, health planners and the public. There is increasing pressure to compare SSI rates between surgeons, institutions and countries. For this to be meaningful, data must be standardised and must include post-discharge surveillance (PDS) as many superficial SSIs do not present to the original institution. Further work is required to determine the best method of conducting PDS. In 2008 two important documents on SSI were published from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America/The Infectious Disease Society of America and the National Institute for Health and Clincal Excellence, UK. Both emphasise key aspects during the preoperative, operative and postoperative phases of patient care. In addition to effective interventions known to be important for some time, e.g. not shaving the surgical site until the day of the procedure, there is increasing emphasis on physiological parameters, e.g. blood glucose concentrations, oxygen tensions and body temperature. Laparoscopic procedures are increasingly associated with reduced SSI rates, and the screening and decontamination of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers is effective for certain surgical procedures but has to be balanced by cost and the risk of mupirocin resistance. Finally, there is a need to convert theory into practice by the rigorous application of SSI healthcare bundles. Recent studies suggest that, with a multidisciplinary approach, simple measures can be effective in reducing SSI rates.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshCross Infection-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfection Control-
dc.subject.meshPatient Discharge-
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance-
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications-
dc.subject.meshSurgical Wound Infection-
dc.titlePreventing surgical site infection. Where now?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Microbiology, RCSI Education and Research Centre, Smurfit Building, Beaumont Hospital, PO Box 9063, Dublin 9, Ireland. hhumphreys@rcsi.ieen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of hospital infectionen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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