Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127442
Title:
Epilepsy care in general practice.
Authors:
Varley, J; Fitzsimons, M; Delanty, N; Collins, C; Boland, M; Normand, C
Affiliation:
Epilepsy Programme, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9. jarlathvarley@beaumont.ie
Citation:
Epilepsy care in general practice. 2009, 102 (6):173-6 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Jun-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127442
PubMed ID:
19722352
Abstract:
Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Continuity of Patient Care; Delivery of Health Care; Epilepsy; Female; Health Care Surveys; Humans; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Neurology; Physician's Practice Patterns; Physicians, Family; Primary Health Care; Questionnaires; Referral and Consultation
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVarley, Jen
dc.contributor.authorFitzsimons, Men
dc.contributor.authorDelanty, Nen
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Cen
dc.contributor.authorBoland, Men
dc.contributor.authorNormand, Cen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-06T14:05:26Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-06T14:05:26Z-
dc.date.issued2009-06-
dc.identifier.citationEpilepsy care in general practice. 2009, 102 (6):173-6 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid19722352-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127442-
dc.description.abstractEpilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshContinuity of Patient Care-
dc.subject.meshDelivery of Health Care-
dc.subject.meshEpilepsy-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveys-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeurology-
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns-
dc.subject.meshPhysicians, Family-
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Care-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshReferral and Consultation-
dc.titleEpilepsy care in general practice.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEpilepsy Programme, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9. jarlathvarley@beaumont.ieen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.