Pharmacological options in the management of orthostatic hypotension in older adults.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127226
Title:
Pharmacological options in the management of orthostatic hypotension in older adults.
Authors:
Kearney, Fiona; Moore, Alan
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland.
Citation:
Pharmacological options in the management of orthostatic hypotension in older adults. 2009, 7 (11):1395-400 Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther
Journal:
Expert review of cardiovascular therapy
Issue Date:
Nov-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127226
DOI:
10.1586/erc.09.130
PubMed ID:
19900022
Abstract:
Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a common disorder in older adults with potentially serious clinical consequences. Understanding the key underlying pathophysiological processes that predispose individuals to OH is essential when making treatment decisions for this group of patients. In this article, we discuss the key antihypotensive agents used in the management of OH in older adults. Commonly, midodrine is used as a first-line agent, given its supportive data in randomized, controlled trials. Fludrocortisone has been evaluated in open-label trials and has long-established usage in clinical practice. Other agents are available and in clinical use, either alone or in combination, but larger randomized trial evaluations are yet to be published. It is important to bear in mind that a patient may be taking medications that predispose to or exacerbate the symptoms of OH. Withdrawal of such medications, where possible, should be considered before commencing other pharmacological agents that attenuate the symptoms of OH.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adrenergic alpha-Agonists; Anti-Inflammatory Agents; Drug Therapy, Combination; Fludrocortisone; Humans; Hypotension, Orthostatic; Midodrine
ISSN:
1744-8344

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKearney, Fionaen
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-05T14:33:47Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-05T14:33:47Z-
dc.date.issued2009-11-
dc.identifier.citationPharmacological options in the management of orthostatic hypotension in older adults. 2009, 7 (11):1395-400 Expert Rev Cardiovasc Theren
dc.identifier.issn1744-8344-
dc.identifier.pmid19900022-
dc.identifier.doi10.1586/erc.09.130-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127226-
dc.description.abstractOrthostatic hypotension (OH) is a common disorder in older adults with potentially serious clinical consequences. Understanding the key underlying pathophysiological processes that predispose individuals to OH is essential when making treatment decisions for this group of patients. In this article, we discuss the key antihypotensive agents used in the management of OH in older adults. Commonly, midodrine is used as a first-line agent, given its supportive data in randomized, controlled trials. Fludrocortisone has been evaluated in open-label trials and has long-established usage in clinical practice. Other agents are available and in clinical use, either alone or in combination, but larger randomized trial evaluations are yet to be published. It is important to bear in mind that a patient may be taking medications that predispose to or exacerbate the symptoms of OH. Withdrawal of such medications, where possible, should be considered before commencing other pharmacological agents that attenuate the symptoms of OH.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdrenergic alpha-Agonists-
dc.subject.meshAnti-Inflammatory Agents-
dc.subject.meshDrug Therapy, Combination-
dc.subject.meshFludrocortisone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypotension, Orthostatic-
dc.subject.meshMidodrine-
dc.titlePharmacological options in the management of orthostatic hypotension in older adults.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geriatric Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalExpert review of cardiovascular therapyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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