Cannabis use and childhood trauma interact additively to increase the risk of psychotic symptoms in adolescence.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127193
Title:
Cannabis use and childhood trauma interact additively to increase the risk of psychotic symptoms in adolescence.
Authors:
Harley, M; Kelleher, I; Clarke, M; Lynch, F; Arseneault, L; Connor, D; Fitzpatrick, C; Cannon, M
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Cannabis use and childhood trauma interact additively to increase the risk of psychotic symptoms in adolescence. 2010, 40 (10):1627-34 Psychol Med
Journal:
Psychological medicine
Issue Date:
Oct-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127193
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291709991966
PubMed ID:
19995476
Abstract:
Adolescent cannabis use has been shown in many studies to increase the risk of later psychosis. Childhood trauma is associated with both substance misuse and risk for psychosis. In this study our aim was to investigate whether there is a significant interaction between cannabis use and childhood trauma in increasing the risk for experiencing psychotic symptoms during adolescence.; Psychiatric interviews using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (K-SADS) semi-structured instrument were carried out with 211 adolescents aged between 12 and 15 years and their parents as part of a population-based study. The interview enquired about early traumatic events, cannabis use and psychiatric symptoms in adolescence.; In separate analyses both cannabis use and childhood trauma were significantly associated with risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms. However, the presence of both childhood trauma and early cannabis use significantly increased the risk for psychotic symptoms beyond the risk posed by either risk factor alone, indicating that there was a greater than additive interaction between childhood trauma and cannabis use.; Our finding of a greater than additive interaction between childhood trauma and cannabis use may have implications for the identification of individuals at high risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms. For example, measures to actively discourage or intensively treat cannabis use in children and adolescents who have experienced abuse may help to prevent the development of psychosis in this vulnerable group. Our findings require replication in larger samples to confirm this interaction effect.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Age of Onset; Child; Child Abuse; Child Abuse, Sexual; Domestic Violence; Family Relations; Female; Humans; Male; Marijuana Abuse; Parents; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Psychotic Disorders; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors
ISSN:
1469-8978

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarley, Men
dc.contributor.authorKelleher, Ien
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Men
dc.contributor.authorLynch, Fen
dc.contributor.authorArseneault, Len
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Den
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Cen
dc.contributor.authorCannon, Men
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-05T14:22:23Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-05T14:22:23Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10-
dc.identifier.citationCannabis use and childhood trauma interact additively to increase the risk of psychotic symptoms in adolescence. 2010, 40 (10):1627-34 Psychol Meden
dc.identifier.issn1469-8978-
dc.identifier.pmid19995476-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291709991966-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127193-
dc.description.abstractAdolescent cannabis use has been shown in many studies to increase the risk of later psychosis. Childhood trauma is associated with both substance misuse and risk for psychosis. In this study our aim was to investigate whether there is a significant interaction between cannabis use and childhood trauma in increasing the risk for experiencing psychotic symptoms during adolescence.-
dc.description.abstractPsychiatric interviews using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (K-SADS) semi-structured instrument were carried out with 211 adolescents aged between 12 and 15 years and their parents as part of a population-based study. The interview enquired about early traumatic events, cannabis use and psychiatric symptoms in adolescence.-
dc.description.abstractIn separate analyses both cannabis use and childhood trauma were significantly associated with risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms. However, the presence of both childhood trauma and early cannabis use significantly increased the risk for psychotic symptoms beyond the risk posed by either risk factor alone, indicating that there was a greater than additive interaction between childhood trauma and cannabis use.-
dc.description.abstractOur finding of a greater than additive interaction between childhood trauma and cannabis use may have implications for the identification of individuals at high risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms. For example, measures to actively discourage or intensively treat cannabis use in children and adolescents who have experienced abuse may help to prevent the development of psychosis in this vulnerable group. Our findings require replication in larger samples to confirm this interaction effect.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAge of Onset-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild Abuse-
dc.subject.meshChild Abuse, Sexual-
dc.subject.meshDomestic Violence-
dc.subject.meshFamily Relations-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMarijuana Abuse-
dc.subject.meshParents-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factors-
dc.titleCannabis use and childhood trauma interact additively to increase the risk of psychotic symptoms in adolescence.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalPsychological medicineen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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