Epilepsy in Ireland: towards the primary-tertiary care continuum.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127192
Title:
Epilepsy in Ireland: towards the primary-tertiary care continuum.
Authors:
Varley, Jarlath; Delanty, Norman; Normand, Charles; Coyne, Imelda; McQuaid, Louise; Collins, Claire; Boland, Michael; Grimson, Jane; Fitzsimons, Mary
Affiliation:
Epilepsy Programme, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland. Jarlathvarley@beaumont.ie
Citation:
Epilepsy in Ireland: towards the primary-tertiary care continuum. 2010, 19 (1):47-52 Seizure
Journal:
Seizure : the journal of the British Epilepsy Association
Issue Date:
Jan-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/127192
DOI:
10.1016/j.seizure.2009.11.002
PubMed ID:
20006527
Abstract:
Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease affecting people of every age, gender, race and socio-economic background. The diagnosis and optimal management relies on contribution from a number of healthcare disciplines in a variety of healthcare settings.; To explore the interface between primary care and specialist epilepsy services in Ireland.; Using appreciative inquiry, focus groups were held with healthcare professionals (n=33) from both primary and tertiary epilepsy specialist services in Ireland.; There are significant challenges to delivering a consistent high standard of epilepsy care in Ireland. The barriers that were identified are: the stigma of epilepsy, unequal access to care services, insufficient human resources, unclear communication between primary-tertiary services and lack of knowledge. Improving the management of people with epilepsy requires reconfiguration of the primary-tertiary interface and establishing clearly defined roles and formalised clinical pathways. Such initiatives require resources in the form of further education and training and increased usage of information communication technology (ICT).; Epilepsy services across the primary-tertiary interface can be significantly enhanced through the implementation of a shared model of care underpinned by an electronic patient record (EPR) system and information communication technology (ICT). Better chronic disease management has the potential to halt the progression of epilepsy with ensuing benefits for patients and the healthcare system.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Attitude of Health Personnel; Continuity of Patient Care; Delivery of Health Care, Integrated; Disease Management; Epilepsy; Humans; Ireland; Patient Satisfaction; Primary Health Care; Specialization; Specialties, Nursing; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
1532-2688

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVarley, Jarlathen
dc.contributor.authorDelanty, Normanen
dc.contributor.authorNormand, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorCoyne, Imeldaen
dc.contributor.authorMcQuaid, Louiseen
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorBoland, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorGrimson, Janeen
dc.contributor.authorFitzsimons, Maryen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-05T14:21:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-05T14:21:22Z-
dc.date.issued2010-01-
dc.identifier.citationEpilepsy in Ireland: towards the primary-tertiary care continuum. 2010, 19 (1):47-52 Seizureen
dc.identifier.issn1532-2688-
dc.identifier.pmid20006527-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.seizure.2009.11.002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127192-
dc.description.abstractEpilepsy is a chronic neurological disease affecting people of every age, gender, race and socio-economic background. The diagnosis and optimal management relies on contribution from a number of healthcare disciplines in a variety of healthcare settings.-
dc.description.abstractTo explore the interface between primary care and specialist epilepsy services in Ireland.-
dc.description.abstractUsing appreciative inquiry, focus groups were held with healthcare professionals (n=33) from both primary and tertiary epilepsy specialist services in Ireland.-
dc.description.abstractThere are significant challenges to delivering a consistent high standard of epilepsy care in Ireland. The barriers that were identified are: the stigma of epilepsy, unequal access to care services, insufficient human resources, unclear communication between primary-tertiary services and lack of knowledge. Improving the management of people with epilepsy requires reconfiguration of the primary-tertiary interface and establishing clearly defined roles and formalised clinical pathways. Such initiatives require resources in the form of further education and training and increased usage of information communication technology (ICT).-
dc.description.abstractEpilepsy services across the primary-tertiary interface can be significantly enhanced through the implementation of a shared model of care underpinned by an electronic patient record (EPR) system and information communication technology (ICT). Better chronic disease management has the potential to halt the progression of epilepsy with ensuing benefits for patients and the healthcare system.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshContinuity of Patient Care-
dc.subject.meshDelivery of Health Care, Integrated-
dc.subject.meshDisease Management-
dc.subject.meshEpilepsy-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction-
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Care-
dc.subject.meshSpecialization-
dc.subject.meshSpecialties, Nursing-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleEpilepsy in Ireland: towards the primary-tertiary care continuum.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEpilepsy Programme, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland. Jarlathvarley@beaumont.ieen
dc.identifier.journalSeizure : the journal of the British Epilepsy Associationen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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