Tight glycaemic control is a key factor in wound healing enhancement strategies in an experimental diabetes mellitus model.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/126116
Title:
Tight glycaemic control is a key factor in wound healing enhancement strategies in an experimental diabetes mellitus model.
Authors:
O'Sullivan, J B; Hanson, R; Chan, F; Bouchier-Hayes, D J
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jbarryosullivan@mac.com
Citation:
Tight glycaemic control is a key factor in wound healing enhancement strategies in an experimental diabetes mellitus model. 2011, 180 (1):229-36 Ir J Med Sci
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/126116
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-010-0630-z
PubMed ID:
21110137
Abstract:
Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of impaired wound healing. The aim of this study was to establish a glucose-controlled diabetic wound healing model.; Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control group (C), Diabetic Non-glucose Controlled group (DNC) and Diabetic glucose Controlled group (DC).; Glucose control was achieved using Insulman Rapid (average daily glucose level <10 mmol/L). 18 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a dorsal skin wound incision and 10 days later were killed. Fresh and fixed wound tensile strength, hydroxyproline and transforming growth factor beta-1 levels were improved in the DC group when compared to the DNC group. The quantity of fibroblasts present was similar in each group.; This study demonstrates the impact that diabetes has on acute wound healing and suggests that wound modulating agents must be tested in both the tightly glucose-controlled as well as the poorly glucose-controlled diabetic animal models prior to proceeding with translational clinical studies.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1863-4362

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, J Ben
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Ren
dc.contributor.authorChan, Fen
dc.contributor.authorBouchier-Hayes, D Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-29T14:41:02Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-29T14:41:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.identifier.citationTight glycaemic control is a key factor in wound healing enhancement strategies in an experimental diabetes mellitus model. 2011, 180 (1):229-36 Ir J Med Scien
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362-
dc.identifier.pmid21110137-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-010-0630-z-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/126116-
dc.description.abstractDiabetes mellitus is a leading cause of impaired wound healing. The aim of this study was to establish a glucose-controlled diabetic wound healing model.-
dc.description.abstractSprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control group (C), Diabetic Non-glucose Controlled group (DNC) and Diabetic glucose Controlled group (DC).-
dc.description.abstractGlucose control was achieved using Insulman Rapid (average daily glucose level <10 mmol/L). 18 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a dorsal skin wound incision and 10 days later were killed. Fresh and fixed wound tensile strength, hydroxyproline and transforming growth factor beta-1 levels were improved in the DC group when compared to the DNC group. The quantity of fibroblasts present was similar in each group.-
dc.description.abstractThis study demonstrates the impact that diabetes has on acute wound healing and suggests that wound modulating agents must be tested in both the tightly glucose-controlled as well as the poorly glucose-controlled diabetic animal models prior to proceeding with translational clinical studies.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleTight glycaemic control is a key factor in wound healing enhancement strategies in an experimental diabetes mellitus model.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jbarryosullivan@mac.comen
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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