Reducing twin pregnancy rates after IVF--elective single embryo transfer (eSET).

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/125888
Title:
Reducing twin pregnancy rates after IVF--elective single embryo transfer (eSET).
Authors:
Milne, P; Cottell, E; Allen, C; Spillane, H; Vasallo, J; Wingfield, M
Affiliation:
Merrion Fertility Clinic, National Maternity Hospital, Holles Street, Dublin 2.
Citation:
Reducing twin pregnancy rates after IVF--elective single embryo transfer (eSET). 2010, 103 (1):9-11 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Jan-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/125888
PubMed ID:
20222385
Abstract:
Multiple pregnancy is a major complication of IVF and is associated with increased maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity. Elective single embryo transfer (eSET) during IVF, rather than the more standard transfer of two embryos (double embryo transfer or DET), has been shown to significantly reduce the multiple pregnancy rate associated with IVF, while maintaining acceptable pregnancy rates. Couples undergoing IVF in 2008 who met good prognostic criteria had eSET performed. Pregnancy and twinning rates were compared with those for similar couples in 2007 who had DET. Couples unsuccessful with a fresh cycle of treatment had subsequent frozen embryo transfer cycles with DET. The cumulative pregnancy rate was similar for each group. However there were no multiple pregnancies in the eSET group, compared to 4 twins of 5 pregnancies in the DET group. 96% of eligible couples agreed to eSET. ESET is successful in and acceptable to good prognosis Irish couples undergoing IVF.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Embryo Transfer; Female; Fertilization in Vitro; Humans; Ireland; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Pregnancy Rate; Pregnancy, Multiple; Statistics, Nonparametric; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMilne, Pen
dc.contributor.authorCottell, Een
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Cen
dc.contributor.authorSpillane, Hen
dc.contributor.authorVasallo, Jen
dc.contributor.authorWingfield, Men
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T14:49:29Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T14:49:29Z-
dc.date.issued2010-01-
dc.identifier.citationReducing twin pregnancy rates after IVF--elective single embryo transfer (eSET). 2010, 103 (1):9-11 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid20222385-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/125888-
dc.description.abstractMultiple pregnancy is a major complication of IVF and is associated with increased maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity. Elective single embryo transfer (eSET) during IVF, rather than the more standard transfer of two embryos (double embryo transfer or DET), has been shown to significantly reduce the multiple pregnancy rate associated with IVF, while maintaining acceptable pregnancy rates. Couples undergoing IVF in 2008 who met good prognostic criteria had eSET performed. Pregnancy and twinning rates were compared with those for similar couples in 2007 who had DET. Couples unsuccessful with a fresh cycle of treatment had subsequent frozen embryo transfer cycles with DET. The cumulative pregnancy rate was similar for each group. However there were no multiple pregnancies in the eSET group, compared to 4 twins of 5 pregnancies in the DET group. 96% of eligible couples agreed to eSET. ESET is successful in and acceptable to good prognosis Irish couples undergoing IVF.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshEmbryo Transfer-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFertilization in Vitro-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Rate-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy, Multiple-
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametric-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleReducing twin pregnancy rates after IVF--elective single embryo transfer (eSET).en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMerrion Fertility Clinic, National Maternity Hospital, Holles Street, Dublin 2.en
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen

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