Trends in the obstetric features and management of twin pregnancies.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/125859
Title:
Trends in the obstetric features and management of twin pregnancies.
Authors:
Smith, K E; Ravikumar, N; Hession, M; Morrison, J J
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, NUIG, Galway University Hospital, Newcastle Road, Galway.
Citation:
Trends in the obstetric features and management of twin pregnancies. 2010, 103 (3):70-2 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Mar-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/125859
PubMed ID:
20666067
Abstract:
There are no reports outlining the trends in obstetric features and clinical management of twin pregnancies in an Irish obstetric population. The aim of this study was to investigate these factors for all twin pregnancies delivered during the 19 year period between 1989 and 2007, at Galway University Hospital (GUH). There were 52,199 infants delivered at GUH, of which 1594 infants (3.05% of births) were twins, related to 797 twin pregnancies. The overall incidence of twin pregnancies was 1.52%, increasing from 0.8%-1.0% in the early years of the study to 1.7-1.8% in the latter years of the study (P<0.001). There was a significant increase in incidence of twins born to mothers aged 30-39 years, alongside a significant reduction to mothers aged 20-29 years (P<0.01). The caesarean section rate overall was 41.5% (331/797), of which 54% (n=179) were elective, and 46% (n=152) were emergency, representing an emergency caesarean section rate of 19.1% of all twin pregnancies, and of 24.6% after exclusion of elective caesarean sections. The caesarean section rate for twins increased from 30% in 1989 to greater than 50% in the latter years of the study (P<0.01), related largely to a significant increase in elective caesarean sections (P<0.01). The combined vaginal-caesarean delivery rate was remarkably low at 0.75% of all twin pregnancies, and 1% after exclusion of elective caesarean sections. The preterm delivery rates were 4.1% (<32 weeks), and 16.3% (<36 weeks), with an overall perinatal mortality rate of 37 per 1000. These findings highlight the altered demographic and clinical aspects of twin pregnancies in an Irish obstetric population.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Chi-Square Distribution; Delivery, Obstetric; Female; Hospitals, University; Humans; Incidence; Infant, Newborn; Ireland; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Pregnancy, Multiple; Twins
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, K Een
dc.contributor.authorRavikumar, Nen
dc.contributor.authorHession, Men
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, J Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T14:42:59Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T14:42:59Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-
dc.identifier.citationTrends in the obstetric features and management of twin pregnancies. 2010, 103 (3):70-2 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid20666067-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/125859-
dc.description.abstractThere are no reports outlining the trends in obstetric features and clinical management of twin pregnancies in an Irish obstetric population. The aim of this study was to investigate these factors for all twin pregnancies delivered during the 19 year period between 1989 and 2007, at Galway University Hospital (GUH). There were 52,199 infants delivered at GUH, of which 1594 infants (3.05% of births) were twins, related to 797 twin pregnancies. The overall incidence of twin pregnancies was 1.52%, increasing from 0.8%-1.0% in the early years of the study to 1.7-1.8% in the latter years of the study (P<0.001). There was a significant increase in incidence of twins born to mothers aged 30-39 years, alongside a significant reduction to mothers aged 20-29 years (P<0.01). The caesarean section rate overall was 41.5% (331/797), of which 54% (n=179) were elective, and 46% (n=152) were emergency, representing an emergency caesarean section rate of 19.1% of all twin pregnancies, and of 24.6% after exclusion of elective caesarean sections. The caesarean section rate for twins increased from 30% in 1989 to greater than 50% in the latter years of the study (P<0.01), related largely to a significant increase in elective caesarean sections (P<0.01). The combined vaginal-caesarean delivery rate was remarkably low at 0.75% of all twin pregnancies, and 1% after exclusion of elective caesarean sections. The preterm delivery rates were 4.1% (<32 weeks), and 16.3% (<36 weeks), with an overall perinatal mortality rate of 37 per 1000. These findings highlight the altered demographic and clinical aspects of twin pregnancies in an Irish obstetric population.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution-
dc.subject.meshDelivery, Obstetric-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHospitals, University-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy, Multiple-
dc.subject.meshTwins-
dc.titleTrends in the obstetric features and management of twin pregnancies.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, NUIG, Galway University Hospital, Newcastle Road, Galway.en
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen

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