The routine use of post-operative drains in thyroid surgery: an outdated concept.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124891
Title:
The routine use of post-operative drains in thyroid surgery: an outdated concept.
Authors:
Prichard, R S; Murphy, R; Lowry, A; McLaughlin, R; Malone, C; Kerin, M J
Citation:
The routine use of post-operative drains in thyroid surgery: an outdated concept. 2010, 103 (1):26-7 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Jan-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124891
PubMed ID:
20222393
Abstract:
The use of surgical drains in patients undergoing thyroid surgery is standard surgical teaching. Life-threatening complications, arising from post-operative haematomas, mandates their utilization. There is increasing evidence to suggest that this is an outdated practice. This paper determines whether thyroid surgery can be safely performed without the routine use of drains. A retrospective review of patients undergoing thyroid surgery, over a three year period was performed and post-operative complications documented. One hundred and four thyroidectomies were performed. 63 (60.6%) patients had a partial thyroidectomy, 27 (25.9%) had a total thyroidectomy and 14 (13.5%) had a sub-total thyroidectomy. Suction drains were not inserted in any patient. A cervical haematoma did not develop in any patient in this series and no patient required re-operation. There is no evidence to suggest the routine use of surgical drains following uncomplicated thyroid surgery reduces the rate of haematoma formation or re-operation rates and indeed is now unwarranted.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drainage; Female; Hematoma; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Postoperative Complications; Retrospective Studies; Thyroid Diseases; Thyroidectomy
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrichard, R Sen
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Ren
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Aen
dc.contributor.authorMcLaughlin, Ren
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Cen
dc.contributor.authorKerin, M Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-16T15:53:25Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-16T15:53:25Z-
dc.date.issued2010-01-
dc.identifier.citationThe routine use of post-operative drains in thyroid surgery: an outdated concept. 2010, 103 (1):26-7 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid20222393-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/124891-
dc.description.abstractThe use of surgical drains in patients undergoing thyroid surgery is standard surgical teaching. Life-threatening complications, arising from post-operative haematomas, mandates their utilization. There is increasing evidence to suggest that this is an outdated practice. This paper determines whether thyroid surgery can be safely performed without the routine use of drains. A retrospective review of patients undergoing thyroid surgery, over a three year period was performed and post-operative complications documented. One hundred and four thyroidectomies were performed. 63 (60.6%) patients had a partial thyroidectomy, 27 (25.9%) had a total thyroidectomy and 14 (13.5%) had a sub-total thyroidectomy. Suction drains were not inserted in any patient. A cervical haematoma did not develop in any patient in this series and no patient required re-operation. There is no evidence to suggest the routine use of surgical drains following uncomplicated thyroid surgery reduces the rate of haematoma formation or re-operation rates and indeed is now unwarranted.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshDrainage-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHematoma-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshThyroid Diseases-
dc.subject.meshThyroidectomy-
dc.titleThe routine use of post-operative drains in thyroid surgery: an outdated concept.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen

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