The healing of bony defects by cell-free collagen-based scaffolds compared to stem cell-seeded tissue engineered constructs.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124252
Title:
The healing of bony defects by cell-free collagen-based scaffolds compared to stem cell-seeded tissue engineered constructs.
Authors:
Lyons, Frank G; Al-Munajjed, Amir A; Kieran, Stephen M; Toner, Mary E; Murphy, Ciara M; Duffy, Garry P; O'Brien, Fergal J
Affiliation:
Department of Anatomy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland.
Citation:
The healing of bony defects by cell-free collagen-based scaffolds compared to stem cell-seeded tissue engineered constructs. 2010, 31 (35):9232-43 Biomaterials
Journal:
Biomaterials
Issue Date:
Dec-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124252
DOI:
10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.08.056
PubMed ID:
20863559
Abstract:
One of the key challenges in tissue engineering is to understand the host response to scaffolds and engineered constructs. We present a study in which two collagen-based scaffolds developed for bone repair: a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) and biomimetic collagen-calcium phosphate (CCP) scaffold, are evaluated in rat cranial defects, both cell-free and when cultured with MSCs prior to implantation. The results demonstrate that both cell-free scaffolds showed excellent healing relative to the empty defect controls and somewhat surprisingly, to the tissue engineered (MSC-seeded) constructs. Immunological analysis of the healing response showed higher M1 macrophage activity in the cell-seeded scaffolds. However, when the M2 macrophage response was analysed, both groups (MSC-seeded and non-seeded scaffolds) showed significant activity of these cells which are associated with an immunomodulatory and tissue remodelling response. Interestingly, the location of this response was confined to the construct periphery, where a capsule had formed, in the MSC-seeded groups as opposed to areas of new bone formation in the non-seeded groups. This suggests that matrix deposited by MSCs during in vitro culture may adversely affect healing by acting as a barrier to macrophage-led remodelling when implanted in vivo. This study thus improves our understanding of host response in bone tissue engineering.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Animals; Biomechanics; Bone Regeneration; Calcium Phosphates; Collagen; Glycosaminoglycans; Macrophages; Male; Mesenchymal Stem Cells; Rats; Rats, Wistar; Tissue Engineering; Tissue Scaffolds; Wound Healing; X-Ray Microtomography
ISSN:
1878-5905

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Frank Gen
dc.contributor.authorAl-Munajjed, Amir Aen
dc.contributor.authorKieran, Stephen Men
dc.contributor.authorToner, Mary Een
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Ciara Men
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Garry Pen
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Fergal Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-11T12:42:16Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-11T12:42:16Z-
dc.date.issued2010-12-
dc.identifier.citationThe healing of bony defects by cell-free collagen-based scaffolds compared to stem cell-seeded tissue engineered constructs. 2010, 31 (35):9232-43 Biomaterialsen
dc.identifier.issn1878-5905-
dc.identifier.pmid20863559-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.08.056-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/124252-
dc.description.abstractOne of the key challenges in tissue engineering is to understand the host response to scaffolds and engineered constructs. We present a study in which two collagen-based scaffolds developed for bone repair: a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) and biomimetic collagen-calcium phosphate (CCP) scaffold, are evaluated in rat cranial defects, both cell-free and when cultured with MSCs prior to implantation. The results demonstrate that both cell-free scaffolds showed excellent healing relative to the empty defect controls and somewhat surprisingly, to the tissue engineered (MSC-seeded) constructs. Immunological analysis of the healing response showed higher M1 macrophage activity in the cell-seeded scaffolds. However, when the M2 macrophage response was analysed, both groups (MSC-seeded and non-seeded scaffolds) showed significant activity of these cells which are associated with an immunomodulatory and tissue remodelling response. Interestingly, the location of this response was confined to the construct periphery, where a capsule had formed, in the MSC-seeded groups as opposed to areas of new bone formation in the non-seeded groups. This suggests that matrix deposited by MSCs during in vitro culture may adversely affect healing by acting as a barrier to macrophage-led remodelling when implanted in vivo. This study thus improves our understanding of host response in bone tissue engineering.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBiomechanics-
dc.subject.meshBone Regeneration-
dc.subject.meshCalcium Phosphates-
dc.subject.meshCollagen-
dc.subject.meshGlycosaminoglycans-
dc.subject.meshMacrophages-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMesenchymal Stem Cells-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshRats, Wistar-
dc.subject.meshTissue Engineering-
dc.subject.meshTissue Scaffolds-
dc.subject.meshWound Healing-
dc.subject.meshX-Ray Microtomography-
dc.titleThe healing of bony defects by cell-free collagen-based scaffolds compared to stem cell-seeded tissue engineered constructs.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anatomy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalBiomaterialsen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
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