Mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124145
Title:
Mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis.
Authors:
Coleman, David C; Moran, Gary P; McManus, Brenda A; Sullivan, Derek J
Affiliation:
Microbiology Research Unit, Division of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, University of Dublin, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Republic of Ireland. david.coleman@dental.tcd.ie
Citation:
Mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis. 2010, 5 (6):935-49 Future Microbiol
Journal:
Future microbiology
Issue Date:
Jun-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124145
DOI:
10.2217/fmb.10.51
PubMed ID:
20521937
Abstract:
Candida dubliniensis was first described in 1995 and is the most closely related species to the predominant human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. C. dubliniensis is significantly less prevalent and less pathogenic than C. albicans and is primarily associated with infections in HIV-infected individuals and other immunocompromised cohorts. The population structure of C. dubliniensis consists of three well-defined major clades and is significantly less diverse than C. albicans. The majority of C. dubliniensis isolates are susceptible to antifungal drugs commonly used to treat Candida infections. To date only two major patterns of antifungal drug resistance have been identified and the molecular mechanisms of these are very similar to the resistance mechanisms that have been described previously in C. albicans. However, significant differences are evident in the predominant antifungal drug mechanisms employed by C. dubliniensis, differences that reflect its more clonal nature, its lower prevalence and characteristics of its genome, the complete sequence of which has only recently been determined.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Antifungal Agents; Candida; Drug Resistance, Fungal; Humans; Models, Biological
ISSN:
1746-0921

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColeman, David Cen
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Gary Pen
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, Brenda Aen
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Derek Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-10T12:58:49Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-10T12:58:49Z-
dc.date.issued2010-06-
dc.identifier.citationMechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis. 2010, 5 (6):935-49 Future Microbiolen
dc.identifier.issn1746-0921-
dc.identifier.pmid20521937-
dc.identifier.doi10.2217/fmb.10.51-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/124145-
dc.description.abstractCandida dubliniensis was first described in 1995 and is the most closely related species to the predominant human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. C. dubliniensis is significantly less prevalent and less pathogenic than C. albicans and is primarily associated with infections in HIV-infected individuals and other immunocompromised cohorts. The population structure of C. dubliniensis consists of three well-defined major clades and is significantly less diverse than C. albicans. The majority of C. dubliniensis isolates are susceptible to antifungal drugs commonly used to treat Candida infections. To date only two major patterns of antifungal drug resistance have been identified and the molecular mechanisms of these are very similar to the resistance mechanisms that have been described previously in C. albicans. However, significant differences are evident in the predominant antifungal drug mechanisms employed by C. dubliniensis, differences that reflect its more clonal nature, its lower prevalence and characteristics of its genome, the complete sequence of which has only recently been determined.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAntifungal Agents-
dc.subject.meshCandida-
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Fungal-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.titleMechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMicrobiology Research Unit, Division of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, University of Dublin, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Republic of Ireland. david.coleman@dental.tcd.ieen
dc.identifier.journalFuture microbiologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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