Oral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124051
Title:
Oral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort.
Authors:
Ni Riordain, Richeal; McCreary, Christine
Affiliation:
Oral Medicine Unit, Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. richeal.niriordain@ucc.ie
Citation:
Oral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort. 2009, 45 (11):958-62 Oral Oncol.
Journal:
Oral oncology
Issue Date:
Nov-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124051
DOI:
10.1016/j.oraloncology.2009.04.008
PubMed ID:
19502101
Abstract:
This study investigated the current knowledge and practices of general medical practitioners (GMPs) in Ireland regarding the examination of the oral cavity and the detection of oral malignancy and the training they had received at both undergraduate and postgraduate level and since commencing in practice. A questionnaire survey of GMPs in Ireland was conducted. One hundred and fifty four (65.3%) of the practitioners reported regularly examining the oral mucosa of their patients. Almost half of these (n=68) further qualified this response by stating that they only examined the oral mucosa if the patient reported pain in this area or if the patient specifically requested an oral examination for some reason. Eighty one (34.3%) practitioners surveyed felt confident in their ability to detect oral malignancies with the remaining two thirds unsure of whether they would be able to detect oral cancer. There was a significant association between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on examination of the oral cavity and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=4.811, p<0.05]. A statistically significant association was also found between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on the diagnosis of oral malignant disease and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=6.194, p<0.05]. In conclusion the level of knowledge of Irish general medical practitioners needs to be addressed with appropriate initiatives both at undergraduate level and via CME.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1368-8375

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNi Riordain, Richealen
dc.contributor.authorMcCreary, Christineen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-09T15:43:55Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-09T15:43:55Z-
dc.date.issued2009-11-
dc.identifier.citationOral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort. 2009, 45 (11):958-62 Oral Oncol.en
dc.identifier.issn1368-8375-
dc.identifier.pmid19502101-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.oraloncology.2009.04.008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/124051-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the current knowledge and practices of general medical practitioners (GMPs) in Ireland regarding the examination of the oral cavity and the detection of oral malignancy and the training they had received at both undergraduate and postgraduate level and since commencing in practice. A questionnaire survey of GMPs in Ireland was conducted. One hundred and fifty four (65.3%) of the practitioners reported regularly examining the oral mucosa of their patients. Almost half of these (n=68) further qualified this response by stating that they only examined the oral mucosa if the patient reported pain in this area or if the patient specifically requested an oral examination for some reason. Eighty one (34.3%) practitioners surveyed felt confident in their ability to detect oral malignancies with the remaining two thirds unsure of whether they would be able to detect oral cancer. There was a significant association between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on examination of the oral cavity and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=4.811, p<0.05]. A statistically significant association was also found between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on the diagnosis of oral malignant disease and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=6.194, p<0.05]. In conclusion the level of knowledge of Irish general medical practitioners needs to be addressed with appropriate initiatives both at undergraduate level and via CME.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleOral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentOral Medicine Unit, Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. richeal.niriordain@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalOral oncologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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