Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124034
Title:
Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress.
Authors:
Enjalbert, Brice; Moran, Gary P; Vaughan, Claire; Yeomans, Tim; Maccallum, Donna M; Quinn, Janet; Coleman, David C; Brown, Alistair J P; Sullivan, Derek J
Affiliation:
Aberdeen Fungal Group, School of Medical Sciences, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK.
Citation:
Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress. 2009, 72 (1):216-28 Mol. Microbiol.
Journal:
Molecular microbiology
Issue Date:
Apr-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124034
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2958.2009.06640.x
PubMed ID:
19239621
Abstract:
Candida albicans is more pathogenic than Candida dubliniensis. However, this disparity in virulence is surprising given the high level of sequence conservation and the wide range of phenotypic traits shared by these two species. Increased sensitivity to environmental stresses has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor to the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we investigated, in the first comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by transcriptional profiling, global gene expression in each species when grown under conditions in which the two species exhibit differential stress tolerance. The profiles revealed similar core responses to stresses in both species, but differences in the amplitude of the general transcriptional responses to thermal, salt and oxidative stress. Differences in the regulation of specific stress genes were observed between the two species. In particular, ENA21, encoding a sodium ion transporter, was strongly induced in C. albicans but not in C. dubliniensis. In addition, ENA21 was identified in a forward genetic screen for C. albicans genomic sequences that increase salt tolerance in C. dubliniensis. Introduction of a single copy of CaENA21 was subsequently shown to be sufficient to confer salt tolerance upon C. dubliniensis.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Animals; Candida albicans; DNA, Fungal; Female; Fungal Proteins; Gene Expression Profiling; Genome, Fungal; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Organic Anion Transporters, Sodium-Dependent; Osmotic Pressure; Salt-Tolerance; Species Specificity; Virulence
ISSN:
1365-2958

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEnjalbert, Briceen
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Gary Pen
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorYeomans, Timen
dc.contributor.authorMaccallum, Donna Men
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Janeten
dc.contributor.authorColeman, David Cen
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Alistair J Pen
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Derek Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-09T12:29:45Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-09T12:29:45Z-
dc.date.issued2009-04-
dc.identifier.citationGenome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress. 2009, 72 (1):216-28 Mol. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1365-2958-
dc.identifier.pmid19239621-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2958.2009.06640.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/124034-
dc.description.abstractCandida albicans is more pathogenic than Candida dubliniensis. However, this disparity in virulence is surprising given the high level of sequence conservation and the wide range of phenotypic traits shared by these two species. Increased sensitivity to environmental stresses has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor to the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we investigated, in the first comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by transcriptional profiling, global gene expression in each species when grown under conditions in which the two species exhibit differential stress tolerance. The profiles revealed similar core responses to stresses in both species, but differences in the amplitude of the general transcriptional responses to thermal, salt and oxidative stress. Differences in the regulation of specific stress genes were observed between the two species. In particular, ENA21, encoding a sodium ion transporter, was strongly induced in C. albicans but not in C. dubliniensis. In addition, ENA21 was identified in a forward genetic screen for C. albicans genomic sequences that increase salt tolerance in C. dubliniensis. Introduction of a single copy of CaENA21 was subsequently shown to be sufficient to confer salt tolerance upon C. dubliniensis.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshCandida albicans-
dc.subject.meshDNA, Fungal-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFungal Proteins-
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Profiling-
dc.subject.meshGenome, Fungal-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred BALB C-
dc.subject.meshOligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis-
dc.subject.meshOrganic Anion Transporters, Sodium-Dependent-
dc.subject.meshOsmotic Pressure-
dc.subject.meshSalt-Tolerance-
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificity-
dc.subject.meshVirulence-
dc.titleGenome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAberdeen Fungal Group, School of Medical Sciences, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalMolecular microbiologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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