Biofilm problems in dental unit water systems and its practical control.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124033
Title:
Biofilm problems in dental unit water systems and its practical control.
Authors:
Coleman, D C; O'Donnell, M J; Shore, A C; Russell, R J
Affiliation:
Microbiology Research Unit, Division of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, University of Dublin, Trinity College Dublin, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2, Ireland. david.coleman@dental.tcd.ie
Citation:
Biofilm problems in dental unit water systems and its practical control. 2009, 106 (5):1424-37 J. Appl. Microbiol.
Journal:
Journal of applied microbiology
Issue Date:
May-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124033
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2672.2008.04100.x
PubMed ID:
19187140
Abstract:
Dental chair units (DCUs) contain integrated systems that provide the instruments and services for a wide range of dental procedures. DCUs use water to cool and irrigate DCU-supplied instruments and tooth surfaces during dental treatment. Water is supplied to these instruments by a network of interconnected narrow-bore (2-3 mm) plastic tubes called dental unit waterlines (DUWLs). Many studies over the last 40 years demonstrated that DUWL output water is often contaminated with high densities of micro-organisms, predominantly Gram-negative aerobic heterotropic environmental bacteria, including Legionella and Pseudomonas species. Untreated DUWLs host biofilms that permit micro-organisms to multiply and disperse through the water network and which are aerosolized by DCU instrument use, thus exposing patients and staff to these micro-organisms, to fragments of biofilm and bacterial endotoxins. This review concentrates on how practical developments and innovations in specific areas can contribute to effective DUWL biofilm control. These include the use of effective DUWL treatment agents, improvements to DCU supply water quality, DCU design changes, development of automated DUWL treatment procedures that are effective at controlling biofilm in the long-term and require minimal human intervention, are safe for patients and staff, and which do not cause deterioration of DCU components following prolonged use.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Biofilms; Dental Equipment; Equipment Contamination; Humans; Infection Control, Dental; Water Microbiology
ISSN:
1365-2672

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColeman, D Cen
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, M Jen
dc.contributor.authorShore, A Cen
dc.contributor.authorRussell, R Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-09T12:00:51Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-09T12:00:51Z-
dc.date.issued2009-05-
dc.identifier.citationBiofilm problems in dental unit water systems and its practical control. 2009, 106 (5):1424-37 J. Appl. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1365-2672-
dc.identifier.pmid19187140-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2672.2008.04100.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/124033-
dc.description.abstractDental chair units (DCUs) contain integrated systems that provide the instruments and services for a wide range of dental procedures. DCUs use water to cool and irrigate DCU-supplied instruments and tooth surfaces during dental treatment. Water is supplied to these instruments by a network of interconnected narrow-bore (2-3 mm) plastic tubes called dental unit waterlines (DUWLs). Many studies over the last 40 years demonstrated that DUWL output water is often contaminated with high densities of micro-organisms, predominantly Gram-negative aerobic heterotropic environmental bacteria, including Legionella and Pseudomonas species. Untreated DUWLs host biofilms that permit micro-organisms to multiply and disperse through the water network and which are aerosolized by DCU instrument use, thus exposing patients and staff to these micro-organisms, to fragments of biofilm and bacterial endotoxins. This review concentrates on how practical developments and innovations in specific areas can contribute to effective DUWL biofilm control. These include the use of effective DUWL treatment agents, improvements to DCU supply water quality, DCU design changes, development of automated DUWL treatment procedures that are effective at controlling biofilm in the long-term and require minimal human intervention, are safe for patients and staff, and which do not cause deterioration of DCU components following prolonged use.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBiofilms-
dc.subject.meshDental Equipment-
dc.subject.meshEquipment Contamination-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfection Control, Dental-
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiology-
dc.titleBiofilm problems in dental unit water systems and its practical control.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMicrobiology Research Unit, Division of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, University of Dublin, Trinity College Dublin, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2, Ireland. david.coleman@dental.tcd.ieen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of applied microbiologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
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