Diet and upper-aerodigestive tract cancer in Europe: the ARCAGE study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124013
Title:
Diet and upper-aerodigestive tract cancer in Europe: the ARCAGE study.
Authors:
Lagiou, Pagona; Talamini, Renato; Samoli, Evangelia; Lagiou, Areti; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Slamova, Alena; Schejbalova, Miriam; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsague, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Macfarlane, Gary J; Biggs, Anne-Marie; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Simonato, Lorenzo; Lowry, Raymond J; Conway, David I; McKinney, Patricia A; Znaor, Ariana; McCartan, Bernard E; Healy, Claire M; Marron, Manuela; Hashibe, Mia; Brennan, Paul
Affiliation:
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. pdlagiou@med.uoa.gr
Citation:
Diet and upper-aerodigestive tract cancer in Europe: the ARCAGE study. 2009, 124 (11):2671-6 Int. J. Cancer
Journal:
International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer
Issue Date:
Jun-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/124013
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.24246
PubMed ID:
19230023
Abstract:
There is suggestive, but inconclusive, evidence that dietary factors may affect risk of cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). In the context of the alcohol-related cancers and genetic susceptibility in Europe study, we have examined the association of dietary factors with UADT cancer risk. We have analyzed data from 2,304 patients with UADT cancer and 2,227 control subjects recruited in 14 centers in 10 European countries. Dietary data were collected through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire that also assessed preferred temperature of hot beverages. Statistical analyses were conducted through multiple logistic regression controlling for potential confounding variables, including alcohol intake and smoking habits. Consumption of red meat (OR per increasing tertile = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.05-1.25), but not poultry, was significantly associated with increased UADT cancer risk and the association was somewhat stronger for esophageal cancer. Consumption of fruits (OR per increasing tertile = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.62-0.75) and vegetables (OR per increasing tertile = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.66-0.81) as well as of olive oil (OR for above versus below median = 0.78, 95% CI 0.67-0.90) and tea (OR for above versus below median = 0.83, 95% CI 0.69-0.98) were significantly associated with reduced risk of UADT cancer. There was no indication that an increase in tea or coffee temperature was associated with increased risk of UADT overall or cancer of the esophagus; in fact, the association was, if anything, inverse. In conclusion, the results of this large multicentric study indicate that diet plays an important role in the etiology of UADT cancer.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Case-Control Studies; Diet; Esophageal Neoplasms; Europe; Female; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Humans; Male
ISSN:
1097-0215

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLagiou, Pagonaen
dc.contributor.authorTalamini, Renatoen
dc.contributor.authorSamoli, Evangeliaen
dc.contributor.authorLagiou, Aretien
dc.contributor.authorAhrens, Wolfgangen
dc.contributor.authorPohlabeln, Hermannen
dc.contributor.authorBenhamou, Simoneen
dc.contributor.authorBouchardy, Christineen
dc.contributor.authorSlamova, Alenaen
dc.contributor.authorSchejbalova, Miriamen
dc.contributor.authorMerletti, Francoen
dc.contributor.authorRichiardi, Lorenzoen
dc.contributor.authorKjaerheim, Kristinaen
dc.contributor.authorAgudo, Antonioen
dc.contributor.authorCastellsague, Xavieren
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, Tatiana Ven
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, Gary Jen
dc.contributor.authorBiggs, Anne-Marieen
dc.contributor.authorBarzan, Luigien
dc.contributor.authorCanova, Cristinaen
dc.contributor.authorSimonato, Lorenzoen
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Raymond Jen
dc.contributor.authorConway, David Ien
dc.contributor.authorMcKinney, Patricia Aen
dc.contributor.authorZnaor, Arianaen
dc.contributor.authorMcCartan, Bernard Een
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Claire Men
dc.contributor.authorMarron, Manuelaen
dc.contributor.authorHashibe, Miaen
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-09T11:53:06Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-09T11:53:06Z-
dc.date.issued2009-06-
dc.identifier.citationDiet and upper-aerodigestive tract cancer in Europe: the ARCAGE study. 2009, 124 (11):2671-6 Int. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn1097-0215-
dc.identifier.pmid19230023-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ijc.24246-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/124013-
dc.description.abstractThere is suggestive, but inconclusive, evidence that dietary factors may affect risk of cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). In the context of the alcohol-related cancers and genetic susceptibility in Europe study, we have examined the association of dietary factors with UADT cancer risk. We have analyzed data from 2,304 patients with UADT cancer and 2,227 control subjects recruited in 14 centers in 10 European countries. Dietary data were collected through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire that also assessed preferred temperature of hot beverages. Statistical analyses were conducted through multiple logistic regression controlling for potential confounding variables, including alcohol intake and smoking habits. Consumption of red meat (OR per increasing tertile = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.05-1.25), but not poultry, was significantly associated with increased UADT cancer risk and the association was somewhat stronger for esophageal cancer. Consumption of fruits (OR per increasing tertile = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.62-0.75) and vegetables (OR per increasing tertile = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.66-0.81) as well as of olive oil (OR for above versus below median = 0.78, 95% CI 0.67-0.90) and tea (OR for above versus below median = 0.83, 95% CI 0.69-0.98) were significantly associated with reduced risk of UADT cancer. There was no indication that an increase in tea or coffee temperature was associated with increased risk of UADT overall or cancer of the esophagus; in fact, the association was, if anything, inverse. In conclusion, the results of this large multicentric study indicate that diet plays an important role in the etiology of UADT cancer.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshDiet-
dc.subject.meshEsophageal Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshEurope-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHead and Neck Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.titleDiet and upper-aerodigestive tract cancer in Europe: the ARCAGE study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. pdlagiou@med.uoa.gren
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of cancer. Journal international du canceren
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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