The Irish study of sexual health and relationships sub-report 1 learning about sex and first sexual experiences

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/122327
Title:
The Irish study of sexual health and relationships sub-report 1 learning about sex and first sexual experiences
Authors:
Crisis Pregnancy Agency; Rundle, Kay; Layte, Richard Dr.; McGee, Hannah Prof.
Publisher:
Crisis Pregnancy Agency, Department of Health and Children (DOHC)
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/122327
Additional Links:
http://www.crisispregnancy.ie/research3.php
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Sex and sexuality (see glossary for definitions) has been a relatively taboo subject until recent decades in Ireland, as elsewhere. Perspectives on sex and sexuality in Ireland were traditionally shaped to a large extent by the teachings of the Catholic Church. Sexual intercourse was seen as appropriate only in the context of marriage, with the primary purpose of procreation.2 Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, a number of factors, including the wider availability of popular media, brought about greater liberalism and increased discussion about sex in Ireland. As well, greater mobility, mainly of Irish people travelling abroad from the early 1980s, introduced a whole generation to new perspectives on sexual norms. Church attendance fell over this time and there was an increasing public challenge to the Catholic Church’s stance on issues such as access to contraception. These factors contributed to the development of significant legislative changes in the area of sexual health in the late 20th century. They resulted in increased availability of contraception, legalisation of divorce, decriminalisation of homosexuality and right to information on abortion.3 At the same time, education generally and sex education in particular have increasingly become the responsibility of the State. Irish society has seen a process of increasingly liberal social norms.3 Evidence of this shift includes the separation of sex from a purely procreative function and the view that sex is no longer exclusively associated with marriage. The investigation of sexual health and behaviour requires consideration of the range of factors that can influence them. As well as individual factors, external or structural factors (social, economic and environmental) can determine aspects of health and behaviour. The Department of Health and Children’s (2000) National Health Strategy states in its objectives that “the achievement of health and well-being is not the responsibility of the individual alone”.4 A further objective aims to provide support to disadvantaged groups so that everyone has the same opportunity to attain good health. These objectives highlight the role that external influences can play in determining health, and make clear that it is unlikely that individuals will be able to directly control external determinants of health.
Keywords:
PUBLIC HEALTH; RELATIONSHIP; SEXUAL HEALTH; DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH
ISBN:
1905199112
Sponsors:
Crisis Pregnancy Agency, Department of Health and Children (DOHC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrisis Pregnancy Agencyen
dc.contributor.authorRundle, Kayen
dc.contributor.authorLayte, Richard Dr.en
dc.contributor.authorMcGee, Hannah Prof.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-18T14:38:25Z-
dc.date.available2011-02-18T14:38:25Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.isbn1905199112-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/122327-
dc.descriptionSex and sexuality (see glossary for definitions) has been a relatively taboo subject until recent decades in Ireland, as elsewhere. Perspectives on sex and sexuality in Ireland were traditionally shaped to a large extent by the teachings of the Catholic Church. Sexual intercourse was seen as appropriate only in the context of marriage, with the primary purpose of procreation.2 Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, a number of factors, including the wider availability of popular media, brought about greater liberalism and increased discussion about sex in Ireland. As well, greater mobility, mainly of Irish people travelling abroad from the early 1980s, introduced a whole generation to new perspectives on sexual norms. Church attendance fell over this time and there was an increasing public challenge to the Catholic Church’s stance on issues such as access to contraception. These factors contributed to the development of significant legislative changes in the area of sexual health in the late 20th century. They resulted in increased availability of contraception, legalisation of divorce, decriminalisation of homosexuality and right to information on abortion.3 At the same time, education generally and sex education in particular have increasingly become the responsibility of the State. Irish society has seen a process of increasingly liberal social norms.3 Evidence of this shift includes the separation of sex from a purely procreative function and the view that sex is no longer exclusively associated with marriage. The investigation of sexual health and behaviour requires consideration of the range of factors that can influence them. As well as individual factors, external or structural factors (social, economic and environmental) can determine aspects of health and behaviour. The Department of Health and Children’s (2000) National Health Strategy states in its objectives that “the achievement of health and well-being is not the responsibility of the individual alone”.4 A further objective aims to provide support to disadvantaged groups so that everyone has the same opportunity to attain good health. These objectives highlight the role that external influences can play in determining health, and make clear that it is unlikely that individuals will be able to directly control external determinants of health.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCrisis Pregnancy Agency, Department of Health and Children (DOHC)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCrisis Pregnancy Agency, Department of Health and Children (DOHC)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.crisispregnancy.ie/research3.phpen
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen
dc.subjectRELATIONSHIPen
dc.subjectSEXUAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectDETERMINANTS OF HEALTHen
dc.titleThe Irish study of sexual health and relationships sub-report 1 learning about sex and first sexual experiencesen
dc.typeReporten
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