Somatization disorder: what clinicians need to know

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/121822
Title:
Somatization disorder: what clinicians need to know
Authors:
Egan, Jonathan; Kenny, Maeve
Affiliation:
Mater Misericordiae University Hospital
Citation:
The Irish Psychologist Volume 37, Issues 4, Page 93 2011
Publisher:
The Irish Psychologist
Journal:
The Irish Psychologist
Issue Date:
Feb-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/121822
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Somatization disorder represents a substantial burden for both patients and clinicians, particularly in primary care settings. In this paper we will discuss who these patients are, where they are likely to show up, how they present and how they might be treated. According to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–IV; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1994), somatization disorder is characterised by at least four unexplained pain symptoms, two unexplained non-pain gastrointestinal symptoms, one unexplained sexual or menstrual symptom, and one pseudo-neurological symptom. Physical complaints must begin before 30 years of age and generally last over a number of years. The symptoms are not intentionally produced by the patient (as in malingering) and after appropriate investigation cannot be fully explained by a medical condition. Patients with somatization disorder tend to overuse healthcare services and withdraw from productive and pleasurable activities because of discomfort, fatigue or fear of exacerbating their symptoms (Woolfolk & Allen, 2007).
Keywords:
PRIMARY CARE; PSYCHOLOGY
Local subject classification:
SOMATIZATION DISORDER
Sponsors:
Reproduced with permission from "The Irish Psychologist"

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEgan, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorKenny, Maeveen
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-14T12:55:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-02-14T12:55:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-02-
dc.identifier.citationThe Irish Psychologist Volume 37, Issues 4, Page 93 2011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/121822-
dc.descriptionSomatization disorder represents a substantial burden for both patients and clinicians, particularly in primary care settings. In this paper we will discuss who these patients are, where they are likely to show up, how they present and how they might be treated. According to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–IV; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1994), somatization disorder is characterised by at least four unexplained pain symptoms, two unexplained non-pain gastrointestinal symptoms, one unexplained sexual or menstrual symptom, and one pseudo-neurological symptom. Physical complaints must begin before 30 years of age and generally last over a number of years. The symptoms are not intentionally produced by the patient (as in malingering) and after appropriate investigation cannot be fully explained by a medical condition. Patients with somatization disorder tend to overuse healthcare services and withdraw from productive and pleasurable activities because of discomfort, fatigue or fear of exacerbating their symptoms (Woolfolk & Allen, 2007).en
dc.description.sponsorshipReproduced with permission from "The Irish Psychologist"en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Irish Psychologisten
dc.subjectPRIMARY CAREen
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGYen
dc.subject.otherSOMATIZATION DISORDERen
dc.titleSomatization disorder: what clinicians need to knowen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMater Misericordiae University Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalThe Irish Psychologisten
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