Feeling it: body-centred counter-transference in a sample of Irish clinical psychologists

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/121271
Title:
Feeling it: body-centred counter-transference in a sample of Irish clinical psychologists
Authors:
Egan, Jonathan; Booth, Ailbhe; Trimble, Timothy
Affiliation:
Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, St. Fintan’s Hospital Portlaoise, Trinity College Dublin.
Citation:
Irish Psychologist Volume 36 Issue 12 2010
Publisher:
The Psychological Society of Ireland
Journal:
Irish Psychologist
Issue Date:
Oct-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/121271
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Recent psychotherapy research has investigated the physical reactions of therapists to their clients and the potential utility of these reactions in therapeutic settings. These bodily reactions can range from nausea and genital pain to headaches. They are collectively known as body-centred counter-transference. The current exploratory study used the Egan and Carr (2005) body-centred counter-transference scale to assess the frequency of body-centred counter-transference in a sample of Irish clinical Psychologists (N = 87). The study looked at the relationship between body-centred counter-transference and a variety of other variables (age, number of children, years’ post-qualification experience, sick leave, marital status, client session hours per week, clinical supervision, primary client group and therapeutic orientation). The study found no relationship between body-centred counter-transference and any of these variables (p > .05). However, it may be the individual manner in which a therapist engages with and manages the counter-transference manifestation that will determine the effects on the therapist and the therapy.
Keywords:
PSYCHOLOGY
Local subject classification:
BODY CENTRED COUNTER TRANSFERENCE
ISSN:
07904789
Sponsors:
Reproduced with permission from the Irish Psychologist.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEgan, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Ailbheen
dc.contributor.authorTrimble, Timothyen
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-04T15:05:27Z-
dc.date.available2011-02-04T15:05:27Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10-
dc.identifier.citationIrish Psychologist Volume 36 Issue 12 2010en
dc.identifier.issn07904789-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/121271-
dc.descriptionRecent psychotherapy research has investigated the physical reactions of therapists to their clients and the potential utility of these reactions in therapeutic settings. These bodily reactions can range from nausea and genital pain to headaches. They are collectively known as body-centred counter-transference. The current exploratory study used the Egan and Carr (2005) body-centred counter-transference scale to assess the frequency of body-centred counter-transference in a sample of Irish clinical Psychologists (N = 87). The study looked at the relationship between body-centred counter-transference and a variety of other variables (age, number of children, years’ post-qualification experience, sick leave, marital status, client session hours per week, clinical supervision, primary client group and therapeutic orientation). The study found no relationship between body-centred counter-transference and any of these variables (p > .05). However, it may be the individual manner in which a therapist engages with and manages the counter-transference manifestation that will determine the effects on the therapist and the therapy.en
dc.description.sponsorshipReproduced with permission from the Irish Psychologist.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Psychological Society of Irelanden
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGYen
dc.subject.otherBODY CENTRED COUNTER TRANSFERENCEen
dc.titleFeeling it: body-centred counter-transference in a sample of Irish clinical psychologistsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMater Misericordiae University Hospital, St. Fintan’s Hospital Portlaoise, Trinity College Dublin.en
dc.identifier.journalIrish Psychologisten
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