Frontonasal dysmorphology in bipolar disorder by 3D laser surface imaging and geometric morphometrics: comparisons with schizophrenia.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/120274
Title:
Frontonasal dysmorphology in bipolar disorder by 3D laser surface imaging and geometric morphometrics: comparisons with schizophrenia.
Authors:
Hennessy, Robin J; Baldwin, Patrizia A; Browne, David J; Kinsella, Anthony; Waddington, John L
Affiliation:
Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, St. Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Ireland.
Citation:
Frontonasal dysmorphology in bipolar disorder by 3D laser surface imaging and geometric morphometrics: comparisons with schizophrenia. 2010, 122 (1-3):63-71 Schizophr. Res.
Journal:
Schizophrenia research
Issue Date:
Sep-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/120274
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2010.05.001
PubMed ID:
20554158
Abstract:
Any developmental relationship between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia engenders continuing debate. As the brain and face emerge in embryological intimacy, brain dysmorphogenesis is accompanied by facial dysmorphogenesis. 3D laser surface imaging was used to capture the facial surface of 13 male and 14 female patients with bipolar disorder in comparison with 61 male and 75 female control subjects and with 37 male and 32 female patients with schizophrenia. Surface images were analysed using geometric morphometrics and 3D visualisations to identify domains of facial shape that distinguish bipolar patients from controls and bipolar patients from those with schizophrenia. Both male and female bipolar patients evidenced significant facial dysmorphology: common to male and female patients was overall facial widening, increased width of nose, narrowing of mouth and upward displacement of the chin; dysmorphology differed between male and female patients for nose length, lip thickness and tragion height. There were few morphological differences in comparison with schizophrenia patients. That dysmorphology of the frontonasal prominences and related facial regions in bipolar disorder is more similar to than different from that found in schizophrenia indicates some common dysmorphogenesis. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia might reflect similar insult(s) acting over slightly differing time-frames or slightly differing insult(s) acting over a similar time-frame.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
DEPRESSION; SCHIZOPHRENIA; SCREENING
Local subject classification:
BIPOLAR DISORDER; DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS
MeSH:
Adult; Analysis of Variance; Bipolar Disorder; Cephalometry; Diagnostic Imaging; Face; Female; Forehead; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Lasers; Male; Middle Aged; Nose; Principal Component Analysis; Schizophrenia; Young Adult
ISSN:
1573-2509

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHennessy, Robin Jen
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Patrizia Aen
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, David Jen
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Anthonyen
dc.contributor.authorWaddington, John Len
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-24T12:08:07Z-
dc.date.available2011-01-24T12:08:07Z-
dc.date.issued2010-09-
dc.identifier.citationFrontonasal dysmorphology in bipolar disorder by 3D laser surface imaging and geometric morphometrics: comparisons with schizophrenia. 2010, 122 (1-3):63-71 Schizophr. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn1573-2509-
dc.identifier.pmid20554158-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2010.05.001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/120274-
dc.description.abstractAny developmental relationship between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia engenders continuing debate. As the brain and face emerge in embryological intimacy, brain dysmorphogenesis is accompanied by facial dysmorphogenesis. 3D laser surface imaging was used to capture the facial surface of 13 male and 14 female patients with bipolar disorder in comparison with 61 male and 75 female control subjects and with 37 male and 32 female patients with schizophrenia. Surface images were analysed using geometric morphometrics and 3D visualisations to identify domains of facial shape that distinguish bipolar patients from controls and bipolar patients from those with schizophrenia. Both male and female bipolar patients evidenced significant facial dysmorphology: common to male and female patients was overall facial widening, increased width of nose, narrowing of mouth and upward displacement of the chin; dysmorphology differed between male and female patients for nose length, lip thickness and tragion height. There were few morphological differences in comparison with schizophrenia patients. That dysmorphology of the frontonasal prominences and related facial regions in bipolar disorder is more similar to than different from that found in schizophrenia indicates some common dysmorphogenesis. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia might reflect similar insult(s) acting over slightly differing time-frames or slightly differing insult(s) acting over a similar time-frame.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDEPRESSIONen
dc.subjectSCHIZOPHRENIAen
dc.subjectSCREENINGen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder-
dc.subject.meshCephalometry-
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Imaging-
dc.subject.meshFace-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshForehead-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImaging, Three-Dimensional-
dc.subject.meshLasers-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNose-
dc.subject.meshPrincipal Component Analysis-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.subject.otherBIPOLAR DISORDERen
dc.subject.otherDIAGNOSTIC TOOLSen
dc.titleFrontonasal dysmorphology in bipolar disorder by 3D laser surface imaging and geometric morphometrics: comparisons with schizophrenia.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMolecular and Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, St. Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalSchizophrenia researchen

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