North South survey of children’s oral health in Ireland 2002

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/119028
Title:
North South survey of children’s oral health in Ireland 2002
Authors:
Whelton, Helen; O'Mullane, D.; Harding, M.; Guiney, H.; Cronin, M.; Flannery, E.; Kelleher, Virginia
Affiliation:
University College Cork (UCC)
Publisher:
Brunswick Press Ltd.
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/119028
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Executive Summary highlights: Since 1964, water supplies in the Republic of Ireland (RoI) have been adjusted to 0.8 to 1.0 parts per million (ppm) fluoride. Currently 71% of the population receive fluoridated domestic water supplies. • In RoI, decay levels are lower among children with fluoridated domestic water supplies than they are among those with no domestic water fluoridation. • Decay levels are lower among children who get fluoride in their water supply in RoI than they are among children in Northern Ireland (NI, no water fluoridation). • Although decay levels are higher amongst the less well off, disadvantage does not account for the difference seen between flouridated and non flouridated areas. Fluoridation is effective in both disadvantaged and non disadvantaged groups. • The prevalence of dental fluorosis (most commonly seen as paper white patches or fine white lines on the tooth enamel) is higher amongst children and adolescents with fluoridated water supplies. • Despite the effectiveness of water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes, there is little cause for complacency since tooth decay continues to be a very common disease. For example by age 15, 73% of adolescents with fluoridated water supplies in RoI already have decay in their permanent teeth, this compares with 81% in non fluoridated NI. • Children in RoI have amongst the highest frequency of consumption of foods and drinks sweetened with sugar when compared with 34 other countries (WHO). Given their unfavourable dietary habits and average or below average frequency of brushing (WHO), water fluoridation continues to be an important preventive agent for the control of dental decay levels in Ireland. • The factors associated with variation in decay levels amongst 15-year-old adolescents in RoI were fluoridation status, parents’ occupational status, frequency of tooth brushing, method of rinsing after tooth brushing and frequency of snacking. • In NI, there were two factors found to be associated with varying decay levels amongst 15- year-old adolescents, these were parents’ occupational status and amount of toothpaste used when brushing. • The level of oral hygiene was judged to be unsatisfactory for the majority of children in RoI; this variable was not measured in NI. • The percentage of 15-year-olds who were under orthodontic treatment or had completed treatment rose from 14% in 1984 to 23% in 2002 in RoI. • Dependants of medical card holders were less likely to have had orthodontic treatment than those without medical cards (17% vs 26%). • Amongst 15-year-olds, 22% of those in RoI had trauma to their anterior teeth, compared with 14% in NI. A high proportion of this trauma to anterior teeth remains untreated in RoI. • In RoI, one in five 12-year-old children, and one in three 15-year-old adolescents, had tooth wear exposing dentine on at least one anterior permanent tooth. • In RoI, 46% of parents were ‘very satisfied’ and 37% were ‘satisfied’ with the dental service provided to their children, 4% of parents were either ‘dissatisfied’ or ‘very dissatisfied’ with the service. In NI, almost all the parents completing the questionnaire were either ‘very satisfied’ (69%) or ‘satisfied’ (29%) with the service provided.
Keywords:
ORAL HEALTH; ORAL HEALTH PROMOTION
Sponsors:
Department of Health and Children, Health Service Executive, Northern Ireland The Department of Health Social Services and Public Safety, WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Health Services Research University College Cork

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhelton, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorO'Mullane, D.en
dc.contributor.authorHarding, M.en
dc.contributor.authorGuiney, H.en
dc.contributor.authorCronin, M.en
dc.contributor.authorFlannery, E.en
dc.contributor.authorKelleher, Virginiaen
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-10T09:43:14Z-
dc.date.available2011-01-10T09:43:14Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/119028-
dc.descriptionExecutive Summary highlights: Since 1964, water supplies in the Republic of Ireland (RoI) have been adjusted to 0.8 to 1.0 parts per million (ppm) fluoride. Currently 71% of the population receive fluoridated domestic water supplies. • In RoI, decay levels are lower among children with fluoridated domestic water supplies than they are among those with no domestic water fluoridation. • Decay levels are lower among children who get fluoride in their water supply in RoI than they are among children in Northern Ireland (NI, no water fluoridation). • Although decay levels are higher amongst the less well off, disadvantage does not account for the difference seen between flouridated and non flouridated areas. Fluoridation is effective in both disadvantaged and non disadvantaged groups. • The prevalence of dental fluorosis (most commonly seen as paper white patches or fine white lines on the tooth enamel) is higher amongst children and adolescents with fluoridated water supplies. • Despite the effectiveness of water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes, there is little cause for complacency since tooth decay continues to be a very common disease. For example by age 15, 73% of adolescents with fluoridated water supplies in RoI already have decay in their permanent teeth, this compares with 81% in non fluoridated NI. • Children in RoI have amongst the highest frequency of consumption of foods and drinks sweetened with sugar when compared with 34 other countries (WHO). Given their unfavourable dietary habits and average or below average frequency of brushing (WHO), water fluoridation continues to be an important preventive agent for the control of dental decay levels in Ireland. • The factors associated with variation in decay levels amongst 15-year-old adolescents in RoI were fluoridation status, parents’ occupational status, frequency of tooth brushing, method of rinsing after tooth brushing and frequency of snacking. • In NI, there were two factors found to be associated with varying decay levels amongst 15- year-old adolescents, these were parents’ occupational status and amount of toothpaste used when brushing. • The level of oral hygiene was judged to be unsatisfactory for the majority of children in RoI; this variable was not measured in NI. • The percentage of 15-year-olds who were under orthodontic treatment or had completed treatment rose from 14% in 1984 to 23% in 2002 in RoI. • Dependants of medical card holders were less likely to have had orthodontic treatment than those without medical cards (17% vs 26%). • Amongst 15-year-olds, 22% of those in RoI had trauma to their anterior teeth, compared with 14% in NI. A high proportion of this trauma to anterior teeth remains untreated in RoI. • In RoI, one in five 12-year-old children, and one in three 15-year-old adolescents, had tooth wear exposing dentine on at least one anterior permanent tooth. • In RoI, 46% of parents were ‘very satisfied’ and 37% were ‘satisfied’ with the dental service provided to their children, 4% of parents were either ‘dissatisfied’ or ‘very dissatisfied’ with the service. In NI, almost all the parents completing the questionnaire were either ‘very satisfied’ (69%) or ‘satisfied’ (29%) with the service provided.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Health and Children, Health Service Executive, Northern Ireland The Department of Health Social Services and Public Safety, WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Health Services Research University College Corken
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBrunswick Press Ltd.en
dc.subjectORAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectORAL HEALTH PROMOTIONen
dc.titleNorth South survey of children’s oral health in Ireland 2002en
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Cork (UCC)en
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