Oral health of children attending special needs schools and day care centres

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/119005
Title:
Oral health of children attending special needs schools and day care centres
Authors:
Whelton, Helen; Crowley, Evelyn; Nunn, J.; Murphy, A.; kelleher, V.; Guiney, H.; Cronin, M.; Flannery, E.
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE), University College Cork (UCC), Department of Health and Children (DOHC)
Issue Date:
Jul-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/119005
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
A survey of the oral health and need for dental treatment was undertaken on children and adolescents with special needs in Ireland in 2003. The group had predominantly mild and moderate disabilities although a small number had severe impairments. The participants’ potential for cooperation with dental care ranged from those who could receive routine dental treatment in a primary care setting to those who would require sedation or general anaesthesia for even the most basic dental examination. The Disability Act 2005 outlines our responsibilities to people with disabilities. Good oral health is a right and indeed is integral to enabling the better assimilation of people with disabilities into society. Poor oral health, ugly stained teeth, abscesses, gaps and bad breath detracts from people’s quality of life and compounds the disadvantage that many of these children and adolescents already suffer. Prevention of oral disease in this sub group of the population is therefore fundamental since the need for dental treatment, or its provision, may further add to the morbidity and even mortality for some patients. The consequences of tooth loss can be particularly devastating for those with disabilities and permanent tooth loss levels among this young population already exceed that amongst the same age group in the general population The findings are summarised at the start of this report followed by the full results and more detailed summaries for each section. The major considerations for policy makers revealed by the study results are that: The current level of oral and dental care available to children and adolescents with special needs is inadequate and urgently needs to be expanded in order to bring services up to an acceptable level, comparable at least to that of their peers or better, given the serious health consequences of oral diseases for this group of children and adolescents. The results not only expose the lack of suitably trained personnel to deliver a quality service but also the precarious reliance on a small cohort of very dedicated and experienced dental teams, inequitably distributed across the country. The results of this survey point to the fact that for many, their first encounter with the dental services is too late since oral and dental diseases have become established and accessing and accepting dental care will pose significant new challenges.. Thirty-five percent of children in the five-year-old group had never been to a dentist. Fourteen percent of children from the 12-year-old group and 21% from the 15-year-old group had their first ever visit to a dentist when they were 9 years of age or older. One in three of the 12- and 15-year-old group with special needs had already received dental treatment under a general anaesthetic. The consequences of this approach are seen in the results of the oral health survey of adults with intellectual impairments1 Early introduction to the dental service and tailored oral hygiene support is fundamental for children and adolescents with special needs. Oral and dental diseases are avoidable and prevention is paramount given the high probability of requiring general anaesthesia (with its accompanying risks and cost) for the provision of what for children without disability would be routine care.
Keywords:
ORAL HEALTH; CHILD HEALTH; ADOLESCENCE
Local subject classification:
SPECIAL NEEDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhelton, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorCrowley, Evelynen
dc.contributor.authorNunn, J.en
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, A.en
dc.contributor.authorkelleher, V.en
dc.contributor.authorGuiney, H.en
dc.contributor.authorCronin, M.en
dc.contributor.authorFlannery, E.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-10T08:55:49Z-
dc.date.available2011-01-10T08:55:49Z-
dc.date.issued2009-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/119005-
dc.descriptionA survey of the oral health and need for dental treatment was undertaken on children and adolescents with special needs in Ireland in 2003. The group had predominantly mild and moderate disabilities although a small number had severe impairments. The participants’ potential for cooperation with dental care ranged from those who could receive routine dental treatment in a primary care setting to those who would require sedation or general anaesthesia for even the most basic dental examination. The Disability Act 2005 outlines our responsibilities to people with disabilities. Good oral health is a right and indeed is integral to enabling the better assimilation of people with disabilities into society. Poor oral health, ugly stained teeth, abscesses, gaps and bad breath detracts from people’s quality of life and compounds the disadvantage that many of these children and adolescents already suffer. Prevention of oral disease in this sub group of the population is therefore fundamental since the need for dental treatment, or its provision, may further add to the morbidity and even mortality for some patients. The consequences of tooth loss can be particularly devastating for those with disabilities and permanent tooth loss levels among this young population already exceed that amongst the same age group in the general population The findings are summarised at the start of this report followed by the full results and more detailed summaries for each section. The major considerations for policy makers revealed by the study results are that: The current level of oral and dental care available to children and adolescents with special needs is inadequate and urgently needs to be expanded in order to bring services up to an acceptable level, comparable at least to that of their peers or better, given the serious health consequences of oral diseases for this group of children and adolescents. The results not only expose the lack of suitably trained personnel to deliver a quality service but also the precarious reliance on a small cohort of very dedicated and experienced dental teams, inequitably distributed across the country. The results of this survey point to the fact that for many, their first encounter with the dental services is too late since oral and dental diseases have become established and accessing and accepting dental care will pose significant new challenges.. Thirty-five percent of children in the five-year-old group had never been to a dentist. Fourteen percent of children from the 12-year-old group and 21% from the 15-year-old group had their first ever visit to a dentist when they were 9 years of age or older. One in three of the 12- and 15-year-old group with special needs had already received dental treatment under a general anaesthetic. The consequences of this approach are seen in the results of the oral health survey of adults with intellectual impairments1 Early introduction to the dental service and tailored oral hygiene support is fundamental for children and adolescents with special needs. Oral and dental diseases are avoidable and prevention is paramount given the high probability of requiring general anaesthesia (with its accompanying risks and cost) for the provision of what for children without disability would be routine care.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectORAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen
dc.subjectADOLESCENCEen
dc.subject.otherSPECIAL NEEDSen
dc.titleOral health of children attending special needs schools and day care centresen
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE), University College Cork (UCC), Department of Health and Children (DOHC)en
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