Study of young carers in the Irish population: main report

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/115352
Title:
Study of young carers in the Irish population: main report
Authors:
Fives, Allyn; Kennan, Danielle; Canavan, John; Brady, Bernadine; Cairns, David; Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs; Department of Health of Children (DOHC)
Affiliation:
Child and Family Research Centre at the National University galway
Publisher:
Government Publications
Issue Date:
Oct-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/115352
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (OMCYA) commissioned this study in September 2008. In the Framework Social Partnership Agreement 2006-2015, Towards 2016 (Department of the Taoiseach, 2006), the Irish Government committed itself to study the extent to which children undertake ‘inappropriate care roles’ and to establish the extent and degree to which this issue arises and the levels of impact it has on the lives of the children concerned. The Government’s approach was two-fold: (1) it requested the Central Statistics Office (CSO) to undertake additional analysis on the 15-17 year-old children identified in the 2006 Census as carers; and (2) it commissioned this study through the OMCYA. Of particular interest to the OMCYA (2008) in its Request for Tender was ‘inappropriate’ care. According to the OMCYA, the responsibilities of such young carers may include, from a young age, personal or intimate care, emotional support, help with mobility, domestic tasks and helping to look after younger siblings. It is believed that young carers differ from other children in terms of the extent of their caring, its nature, the time involved and the outcomes for their development and their social and economic participation. The Request for Tender also noted that, even where the development of services for young carers is advanced, as in the UK, there are still low levels of access to those services. What is more, young carers are, it is argued, a largely hidden group within society and this commissioned study was asked to look at ‘mechanisms to empower these young people to come forward to avail of services’.
Keywords:
CARER; PEOPLE WITH DISABILITY; CHILD
Series/Report no.:
National children's strategy research series

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFives, Allynen
dc.contributor.authorKennan, Danielleen
dc.contributor.authorCanavan, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Bernadineen
dc.contributor.authorCairns, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorOffice of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairsen
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health of Children (DOHC)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-11T12:14:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-11T12:14:54Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/115352-
dc.descriptionThe Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (OMCYA) commissioned this study in September 2008. In the Framework Social Partnership Agreement 2006-2015, Towards 2016 (Department of the Taoiseach, 2006), the Irish Government committed itself to study the extent to which children undertake ‘inappropriate care roles’ and to establish the extent and degree to which this issue arises and the levels of impact it has on the lives of the children concerned. The Government’s approach was two-fold: (1) it requested the Central Statistics Office (CSO) to undertake additional analysis on the 15-17 year-old children identified in the 2006 Census as carers; and (2) it commissioned this study through the OMCYA. Of particular interest to the OMCYA (2008) in its Request for Tender was ‘inappropriate’ care. According to the OMCYA, the responsibilities of such young carers may include, from a young age, personal or intimate care, emotional support, help with mobility, domestic tasks and helping to look after younger siblings. It is believed that young carers differ from other children in terms of the extent of their caring, its nature, the time involved and the outcomes for their development and their social and economic participation. The Request for Tender also noted that, even where the development of services for young carers is advanced, as in the UK, there are still low levels of access to those services. What is more, young carers are, it is argued, a largely hidden group within society and this commissioned study was asked to look at ‘mechanisms to empower these young people to come forward to avail of services’.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGovernment Publicationsen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNational children's strategy research seriesen
dc.subjectCARERen
dc.subjectPEOPLE WITH DISABILITYen
dc.subjectCHILDen
dc.titleStudy of young carers in the Irish population: main reporten
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentChild and Family Research Centre at the National University galwayen
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