Preterm birth and reduced birthweight in first and second teenage pregnancies: a register-based cohort study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/115269
Title:
Preterm birth and reduced birthweight in first and second teenage pregnancies: a register-based cohort study.
Authors:
Khashan, Ali S; Baker, Philip N; Kenny, Louise C
Affiliation:
Anu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. a.khashan@ucc.ie.
Citation:
Preterm birth and reduced birthweight in first and second teenage pregnancies: a register-based cohort study. 2010, 10:36 BMC Pregnancy Childbirth
Journal:
BMC pregnancy and childbirth
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/115269
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2393-10-36
PubMed ID:
20618921
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Higher risks of preterm birth and small for gestational age babies have been reported in teenagers. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between first and second teenage pregnancies and preterm birth, birthweight and small for gestational age (SGA). METHODS: All women aged 14 to 29 yrs who gave birth to live singletons in the North Western Region of England between January 1st 2004 and December 31st 2006 were identified. Women were classified in three groups; 14-17 yrs, 18-19 yrs and 20-29 yrs (reference group). The outcome measures were preterm birth, very preterm birth, birthweight, SGA (< 5th percentile), very SGA (VSGA< 3rd percentile). We compared these outcome measures in teenagers' first and second pregnancies with those of mothers aged 20 to 29 yrs. RESULTS: The risk of preterm birth was increased in first (OR = 1.21, [95% CI: 1.01-1.45]) and second (OR = 1.93, [95% CI: 1.38-2.69]) time mothers aged 14-17 yrs compared to the reference group. Birthweight was reduced in the first (mean difference = -24 g; [95% CI: -40, -7]) and second (mean difference = -80 g; [95% CI: -115, -46]) time mothers aged 14-17 yrs compared to the reference group. There was some evidence of a protective effect against VSGA in 14-17 yr old first time mothers (OR = 0.79, [95% CI: 0.63-0.99]). CONCLUSIONS: Teenage mothers are at increased risk of preterm birth compared to adult mothers and this risk is further increased in second time teen pregnancies. This study highlights the importance of ensuring pregnant teenagers have appropriate antenatal care. A first pregnancy may be the first and only time a pregnant teenager interacts with health services and this opportunity for health education and the promotion of contraception should not be overlooked.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
TEENAGE PREGNANCY; CHILDBIRTH
MeSH:
Adolescent; Case-Control Studies; Confounding Factors (Epidemiology); England; Female; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Infant, Premature; Infant, Small for Gestational Age; Multivariate Analysis; Obstetric Labor, Premature; Parity; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Pregnancy in Adolescence; Regression Analysis; Risk Factors; Young Adult
ISSN:
1471-2393

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKhashan, Ali Sen
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Philip Nen
dc.contributor.authorKenny, Louise Cen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-10T12:53:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-10T12:53:40Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationPreterm birth and reduced birthweight in first and second teenage pregnancies: a register-based cohort study. 2010, 10:36 BMC Pregnancy Childbirthen
dc.identifier.issn1471-2393-
dc.identifier.pmid20618921-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2393-10-36-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/115269-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Higher risks of preterm birth and small for gestational age babies have been reported in teenagers. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between first and second teenage pregnancies and preterm birth, birthweight and small for gestational age (SGA). METHODS: All women aged 14 to 29 yrs who gave birth to live singletons in the North Western Region of England between January 1st 2004 and December 31st 2006 were identified. Women were classified in three groups; 14-17 yrs, 18-19 yrs and 20-29 yrs (reference group). The outcome measures were preterm birth, very preterm birth, birthweight, SGA (< 5th percentile), very SGA (VSGA< 3rd percentile). We compared these outcome measures in teenagers' first and second pregnancies with those of mothers aged 20 to 29 yrs. RESULTS: The risk of preterm birth was increased in first (OR = 1.21, [95% CI: 1.01-1.45]) and second (OR = 1.93, [95% CI: 1.38-2.69]) time mothers aged 14-17 yrs compared to the reference group. Birthweight was reduced in the first (mean difference = -24 g; [95% CI: -40, -7]) and second (mean difference = -80 g; [95% CI: -115, -46]) time mothers aged 14-17 yrs compared to the reference group. There was some evidence of a protective effect against VSGA in 14-17 yr old first time mothers (OR = 0.79, [95% CI: 0.63-0.99]). CONCLUSIONS: Teenage mothers are at increased risk of preterm birth compared to adult mothers and this risk is further increased in second time teen pregnancies. This study highlights the importance of ensuring pregnant teenagers have appropriate antenatal care. A first pregnancy may be the first and only time a pregnant teenager interacts with health services and this opportunity for health education and the promotion of contraception should not be overlooked.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectTEENAGE PREGNANCYen
dc.subjectCHILDBIRTHen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshConfounding Factors (Epidemiology)-
dc.subject.meshEngland-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Premature-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Small for Gestational Age-
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysis-
dc.subject.meshObstetric Labor, Premature-
dc.subject.meshParity-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy in Adolescence-
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysis-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titlePreterm birth and reduced birthweight in first and second teenage pregnancies: a register-based cohort study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAnu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. a.khashan@ucc.ie.en
dc.identifier.journalBMC pregnancy and childbirthen

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