Use of traditional Chinese medicine in Singapore children: perceptions of parents and paediatricians.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/107459
Title:
Use of traditional Chinese medicine in Singapore children: perceptions of parents and paediatricians.
Authors:
Loh, C H
Affiliation:
Medical School, Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, University College Cork, College Road, Cork, Ireland. seanchloh@gmail.com
Citation:
Use of traditional Chinese medicine in Singapore children: perceptions of parents and paediatricians. 2009, 50 (12):1162-8 Singapore Med J
Journal:
Singapore medical journal
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/107459
PubMed ID:
20087553
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: In a country dominated by western healthcare, interest in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is growing. The increasing popularity of TCM, occasionally used with conventional medicine, needs to be assessed, especially in a vulnerable paediatric population. This paper sought to evaluate the use of TCM in children, mainly to determine the common conditions they seek TCM, the pattern of acupuncture or herbal usage for various age groups, the extent of concurrent usage of TCM and conventional medicine, and the reasons for TCM use. Paediatricians' perceptions of TCM will allow us to gauge the acceptability of TCM by those who practise conventional medicine. These are assessed in another arm of this study, with a set of predictive characteristics for their personal TCM use, their perceptions of herb/acupuncture safety, and their own referral to TCM eventually determined. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was administered on 300 parents awaiting consultation at a large TCM clinic. Next, a separate qualitative questionnaire survey form was posted to 100 paediatricians. RESULTS: Herb usage in children is very common (84.3 percent) and 80 percent of parents admitted concurrent usage of TCM and conventional medicine for their children. Drug-herb interactions was an issue of concern for paediatricians. Paediatricians with a higher level of self-reported TCM knowledge were more likely to refer for a cure. CONCLUSION: This was the first study to determine the characteristics of children attending a large TCM clinic in a country which is dominated by western healthcare. It also provided insight into the perceptions of TCM among paediatricians in Singapore. Specifically, it gave us an idea of the predictor traits that determine their referral patterns to TCM and their perceptions of herb and acupuncture safety.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Acupuncture Therapy; Adolescent; Ambulatory Care Facilities; Attitude of Health Personnel; Child; Child, Preschool; Drugs, Chinese Herbal; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Infant; Male; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Parents; Pediatrics; Physicians; Questionnaires; Singapore
ISSN:
0037-5675

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLoh, C Hen
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-12T08:53:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-12T08:53:30Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.identifier.citationUse of traditional Chinese medicine in Singapore children: perceptions of parents and paediatricians. 2009, 50 (12):1162-8 Singapore Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0037-5675-
dc.identifier.pmid20087553-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/107459-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: In a country dominated by western healthcare, interest in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is growing. The increasing popularity of TCM, occasionally used with conventional medicine, needs to be assessed, especially in a vulnerable paediatric population. This paper sought to evaluate the use of TCM in children, mainly to determine the common conditions they seek TCM, the pattern of acupuncture or herbal usage for various age groups, the extent of concurrent usage of TCM and conventional medicine, and the reasons for TCM use. Paediatricians' perceptions of TCM will allow us to gauge the acceptability of TCM by those who practise conventional medicine. These are assessed in another arm of this study, with a set of predictive characteristics for their personal TCM use, their perceptions of herb/acupuncture safety, and their own referral to TCM eventually determined. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was administered on 300 parents awaiting consultation at a large TCM clinic. Next, a separate qualitative questionnaire survey form was posted to 100 paediatricians. RESULTS: Herb usage in children is very common (84.3 percent) and 80 percent of parents admitted concurrent usage of TCM and conventional medicine for their children. Drug-herb interactions was an issue of concern for paediatricians. Paediatricians with a higher level of self-reported TCM knowledge were more likely to refer for a cure. CONCLUSION: This was the first study to determine the characteristics of children attending a large TCM clinic in a country which is dominated by western healthcare. It also provided insight into the perceptions of TCM among paediatricians in Singapore. Specifically, it gave us an idea of the predictor traits that determine their referral patterns to TCM and their perceptions of herb and acupuncture safety.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAmbulatory Care Facilities-
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshDrugs, Chinese Herbal-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMedicine, Chinese Traditional-
dc.subject.meshParents-
dc.subject.meshPediatrics-
dc.subject.meshPhysicians-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshSingapore-
dc.titleUse of traditional Chinese medicine in Singapore children: perceptions of parents and paediatricians.en
dc.contributor.departmentMedical School, Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, University College Cork, College Road, Cork, Ireland. seanchloh@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalSingapore medical journalen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.